Poor In Miami: Hoping To Ride Out Irma On Bread And Cans Of Tuna

Eugene Johnson purchased two loaves of bread and batteries for his flashlight. Those are his supplies in preparation for Hurricane Irma. "I'm on fixed income," said Johnson. "This hit me out of the blue. I had to pay my rent, my electricity bill and stuff like that." In his kitchen cabinet he already had a few cans of tuna and he plans to boil some eggs. While local news broadcasts have been dominated by images of people flocking to stores all week to stock up on water, nonperishable food and...

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Jessica Hill / AP

Hartford Mayor Warns Of Bankruptcy If No State Budget Is Passed

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin sent a letter to Governor Dannel Malloy and state lawmakers on Thursday warning that his city will run out of money in about 60 days and may be forced to file for bankruptcy if the state fails to approve a new budget.

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Courtesy of Pixabay

New York To Spend $10 Million On Clam, Oyster Restoration On Long Island

New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo announced a $10.4 million investment to restore Long Island’s shellfish stocks.

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An explosion followed by gunfire in Kabul on Friday claimed the lives of at least two attackers and wounded a small number of civilians. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which appeared to have been aimed at offices of the International Organization for Migration and stretched over several hours as Afghan security forces tried to hunt down those responsible.

As night fell in Kabul, it was unclear whether the incident was over or not.

Why Former Gitmo Chief Left In Protest

May 24, 2013

President Obama is once again calling for the prison at Guantanamo Bay to be shut down, even though new polls suggest most Americans want it to stay open. But the chorus of critics has gained one surprising member: former Guantanamo Chief Prosecutor Morris Davis. Host Michel Martin talks with Davis about why he now feels the facility should be closed.

California just unveiled a wide array of choices for the 5.3 million people expected to qualify to buy coverage through its online marketplace established by the federal health overhaul.

It's the first disclosure of prices in the nation's most populous state for individual health insurance that complies with the Affordable Care Act, and the menu of affordable options surprised some consumer advocates and analysts who had been expecting premiums to be much higher.

(Most recent update: 5:35 p.m. ET.)

Miracle is the word that comes to Dan Sligh's mind after he and his wife, Sally, survived a plunge off a highway bridge in Washington state on Thursday evening.

Representatives of President Bashar Assad's regime have agreed "in principle" to attend an international peace conference aimed at ending more than two years of brutal warfare in Syria, Russia's foreign ministry said Friday.

Irish banking officials should have known there were problems with the controversial 10-euro coin commemorating James Joyce, according to Ireland's RTE News. The coin misquotes the author's Ulysses, and bears an image of Joyce that his estate did not approve.

As the residents of Moore, Okla., and surrounding communities continue to recover from Monday's devastating tornado that killed at least 24 people and injured more than 375, we're keeping an eye on the news from there:

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Walking A Beat: Community Policing In New Haven

Aug 17, 2012
Dan Katz / WSHU

The new police chief in New Haven, Connecticut assigns his officers to walk beats in the city's neighborhoods to get to know those communities. He hopes these new walking beats will reduce the crime rate. Like the state's other two biggest cities, New Haven's crime rate has far exceeded the national average for the past 20 years. Michelle Hackman walked a beat with two of New Haven's policemen to see what community policing looks like and whether it can put a dent in the city's crime.

A Talk With Jules Feiffer

Feb 23, 2011

In this PRNDI Award-winning interview, Mark Herz talks to Jules Feiffer. Feiffer's been a cartoonist for the The Village Voice, a children's book illustrator, playwright, and screenwriter. He shares his perspective on being in the eighth decade of a prolific career.

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