Waffle House Shooting Underscores How Gun Laws Vary From State To State

The killing of four people at a Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn., early Sunday morning is exposing the frequent breakdown among law enforcement agencies that regulate gun ownership. A man who had his firearms license revoked in Illinois, after being arrested by the U.S. Secret Service at the White House last July, may have broken no laws by having guns — including an AR-15 — when he moved to Tennessee late last year. However, there is little consensus on the matter, even among law enforcement...

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Former President George. H.W. Bush Hospitalized For Blood Infection

Former President George H.W. Bush, whose wife, Barbara, died just last week, has been admitted to a Houston hospital for an infection that has spread to his blood. "He is responding to treatments and appears to be recovering," Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath said in a statement. "We will issue additional updates as events warrant." The 93-year-old Bush was admitted to Houston Methodist Hospital on Sunday morning, the day after his wife's funeral. The two had been married for 73 years when...

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'Westworld' Returns With More Plot, Less Philosophy

Here's the good news about Westworld 2.0: It's a little easier to follow than the first cycle. That's a welcome development, because the debut season of HBO's sci-fi-infused drama about artificial people in the world's trippiest theme park seemed to twist itself in knots to keep viewers guessing. Worst of all, the effort didn't work: Many fans guessed the show's biggest plot twists weeks before they were revealed onscreen. The first season ended more than a year ago, so here's a refresher...

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Former Playboy model Karen McDougal, who claims to have had a 10-month affair with President Trump that ended in 2007, has settled a lawsuit with the owner of the National Enquirer that kept her from publicly discussing the relationship.

Bob Child / AP

There are lots of stories and rumors about secret societies at elite colleges. Skull and Bones is the oldest and most notorious secret college society in America. Not much is known about what goes on at Skull and Bones, but you can easily find its headquarters on the campus of Yale University in New Haven.

Long Island Remains Hotbed Of The Opt-Out Movement

Apr 18, 2018
Carolyn Thompson / AP

Nearly 50 percent of eligible students on Long Island have opted out of the statewide English Language Arts exam this year. It's the fifth year in a row that students have opted out in large numbers.

Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo

New York State plans to use recycled sections of the demolished Tappan Zee Bridge to build six new artificial reefs off Long Island's North Shore. Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the initiative on Tuesday at Sunken Meadow State Park on Long Island.

David Zalubowski / AP

State lawmakers say negotiations are underway between electric carmaker Tesla Motors and Connecticut auto dealers to see if they can finally reach a compromise allowing Tesla to sell its vehicles directly to consumers. 

Frank Franklin II / AP

A new Siena College poll finds Governor Cuomo well ahead of his Democratic and Republican challengers for governor, but at his lowest rate of favorability among voters.

John Minchillo / AP

The parents of two children who died in the 2012 Newtown school shooting are suing Alex Jones for defamation. Jones is a right-wing talk show host and conspiracy theorist who has claimed the shooting didn’t happen. The defamation lawsuits were filed late Monday in Texas, the home state of Jones' media company, Infowars.

The plaintiffs are Neil Heslin, the father of Jesse Lewis, and Leonard Pozner and Veronique De La Rosa, the parents of Noah Pozner. Jesse and Noah were among the 20 students and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School who died in the shooting.

Commercial fishing groups are joining in federal court to challenge the creation of the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument. But the federal government is now asking for the case to be tossed out.

At stake is the future of roughly 5,000 square miles off the coast of Massachusetts, called the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts.

More than 2 out of 3 college students today are not coming straight out of high school. Half are financially independent from their parents, and 1 in 4 are parents themselves.

David Scobey says that, as an American studies and history professor at the University of Michigan for decades, he was "clueless" about the needs of these adult students.

But then, in 2010, he became a dean at The New School, a private college in New York City, heading a division that included a bachelor's degree program designed specifically for adults and transfer students.

Updated on April 19 at 3 p.m. ET

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already is helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. On Thursday she joined her mother, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth, on the Senate floor for a vote.

The newborn's appearance was made possible by a unanimous decision by the Senate on Wednesday evening to change its rules, which typically allow only senators and a handful of staff into the Senate chamber during votes. Now, lawmakers can bring along children under 1.

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