Susan Walsh / AP

Live Coverage: Senate Hears Testimony For Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch

Judge Neil Gorsuch has been grilled by the Senate Judiciary Committee for more than 18 hours of questioning over two separate days, and the proceedings are not finished yet. On Thursday, the committee hears testimony from witnesses about Gorsuch's qualifications to be a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Police Identify Suspect In Deadly London Attack Near U.K. Parliament

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET The man who is believed to have carried out a deadly attack near the U.K. Parliament has been identified by Britain's Metropolitan Police as Khalid Masood, 52. Police believe the man acted alone. He was shot and killed after carrying out an attack that killed a police officer and two civilians and wounded several others around 2:40 p.m. local time Wednesday. Masood was born in Kent and is believed to have been living in the West Midlands. Police say he "was not the...

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Hans Pennink / AP

New Push To Tax New York's Wealthiest

Proponents of raising taxes on New York’s wealthiest say they have a new impetus to increase the state’s revenue – the continued bad news from Washington about deep federal cuts to health care and other areas.

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Pulitzer-Prize winning New York City newspaper columnist Jimmy Breslin died Sunday morning from complications of pneumonia. He was 88 years old, and his death was confirmed by his physician, William Cole.

Breslin was the tabloid voice of the little guy, famous for celebrating gritty New York City characters in newspaper columns, as well as several books of fiction and non-fiction, Often these characters lived in the less glamorous boroughs outside Manhattan. But Breslin was also a character in his own right.

Chuck Berry, the legendary musician who was one of the founders of rock and roll, died Saturday night at age 90. Almost immediately, the tributes started rolling in from some of the most famous names in music.

Supreme Court confirmation hearings are the stuff of novels and movies, but they are the stuff of reality TV, too.

For critics of the nominee — any nominee — the object is drama, even confrontation. For defenders of the nominee, the object is boredom. A confirmation hearing with no sparks and no controversy is a surefire path to a seat on the court.

So far, Gorsuch critics have been having difficulty getting traction — having been trumped, as it were, by other controversies. But there has been plenty going on behind the scenes.

On-air challenge: Take two four-letter words. Rearrange the letters in each of them to make two new words that are opposites.

For example: PEON THUS --> OPEN & SHUT

  1. NAME CINE
  2. VOLE HEAT
  3. FLIT PROD
  4. BUYS LIED
  5. ACME NEWT
  6. OWLS FATS
  7. VEIL DADE
  8. PEEK SOTS
  9. SEAT STEW
  10. AGIN SOLE
  11. HEIR RIFE
  12. WHOS HIED
  13. REAM DUST
  14. SEAN STUN

Afghan Women Say No To The Dress

Mar 19, 2017

It's a story with a happy ending about a demonstration that didn't happen — after activist Afghan women beat back the Ministry of Education decision that schoolgirls must exchange their current already modest uniforms for styles that are more restrictive and concealing.

On March 14, the Afghan ministry unveiled the new designs. Schools in the country were closed at the time (the school year in Afghanistan goes from March through January and set to reopen on the 20th or 21st. The ministry said the change would be effective when classes resumed.

A Walk With WSHU Down Public Radio Memory Lane

Mar 18, 2017
Lea Trusty / WSHU

Here's a little story.

Fifty years ago, the Federal Communications Commission granted an FM license to a small, Roman Catholic commuter college. After getting little traction with its programming, a few intrepid staff turned it into a college radio station. 

The Trump administration has gone to court to try to bring the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau under its control. The bureau is an executive branch entity, but the president doesn't have direct control over the six-year-old agency.

The Justice Department filed a brief with a federal appeals court in Washington on Friday, making the case that the structure of the agency violates the Constitution.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports that, by law, the head of the bureau can be fired by the president — but only for "inefficiency, neglect of duty or malfeasance." Chris adds:

Paris' Orly airport has been evacuated after security forces shot and killed a man who seized the weapon of a soldier on guard.

All flights are being redirected from the airport, and reporter Jake Cigainero in Paris tells NPR's Newscast that police "have completely evacuated the airport and suspended all traffic."

No one else was injured, according to the French interior ministry.

The BBC's Hugh Scofield says the incident happened around 8:30 a.m. local time. He continues:

If the election results of 2016 were really about rejecting the political establishment, then Congress didn't get the memo. After all, 97 percent of incumbents in the U.S. House of Representatives seeking re-election won even as national polls show overwhelming disapproval of Congress.

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