Local, state and regional government-related and political news.

NY Officals Approve Islip's Clean Up Plan

Jan 14, 2015

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has approved the town of Islip's plan to clean up 50,000 tons of toxic debris that was illegally dumped in Roberto Clemente Park in Islip last year. It was laced with asbestos, pesticides, and other toxic material.

The Long Island town's plan to clean up the park requires digging up and removing all the debris and then sampling the soil at the end to confirm the contaminants have been removed. The town will also install wells to monitor groundwater. 

AP Photo/Frank Eltman

Calling it the "major problem facing the state," Governor Cuomo announced a plan to reduce New York’s  highest in the nation rate of property taxes for some homeowners. But the program was not received with open arms by everyone.

Under Cuomo’s proposal, homeowners who pay 6 percent or more of their annual paychecks in taxes, will get a credit on their tax bills. Renters will also receive an equivalent credit.

The Public Utility Regulatory Authority has issued a draft decision to redesign electric bills so that customers can easily see the rate they are being charged.

PURA is responding to legislation passed last year after thousands of customers complained that they were taken advantage of by third-party electricity suppliers, who offered variable rates.

The first page of the redesigned bills would have both the third-party supplier’s rate and the standard rate offered by Connecticut Light & Power and United Illuminating.

AP Photo/Mike Groll

Women’s rights bills were once again debated in the legislature, but ended in a political stalemate, with none of the provisions coming any closer to passage by both houses.

AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File

Connecticut’s utility regulators would like their agency to once again be independent. The agency used to be known as the Department of Public Utility Control, until four years ago. That's when Governor Dannel Malloy changed the name to Public Utility Regulatory Authority, or PURA, and placed it under the state’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Malloy said he did that in an effort to make government more efficient.