News

Zeldin To Introduce Legislation To Help Vets With PTSD

Feb 9, 2016
Charles Lane

Long Island Congressman Lee Zeldin is introducing legislation that would create nationwide “peer to peer” counseling for veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. It’s based on a program he helped create while in the New York State Senate that’s already up and running.

Zeldin said the program in New York has helped more than 1,500 veterans struggling with PTSD.

(AP Photo/Julia Randall)

In 2014, the state of Connecticut quarantined nine residents due to fears of Ebola. They’d just come back from Liberia, one of the countries at the center of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, but they didn’t have Ebola. Eight of the nine are now suing the state in a lawsuit filed by students at Yale Law School.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

The U.S. Attorney who convicted both of the leaders of the legislature came to Albany Monday to speak to a conference of the state’s mayors. But Preet Bharara was not invited to the State Capitol itself, and he did not meet directly with any lawmakers, even though Bharara and Governor Andrew Cuomo attended the same event, the swearing in of the state’ new chief judge.

Bharara addressed mayors from all over the state, gathered for their annual meeting, where he told them the point of his anti-corruption work is to “protect democracy.”

(Connecticut Department of Transportation via AP)

Authorities said a charter bus that crashed on Interstate 95 during a snowstorm was on its way to a Connecticut casino with passengers from New York City.

Mohegan Sun spokesman Cody Chapman said this afternoon that other buses headed for the casino were rerouted back to New York City until weather conditions improve.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut said he’ll propose a bill that would pay to remove lead from homes and businesses.

Murphy says a tax credit would lower the chances of lead poisoning in Connecticut. In the northeast, lead was commonly used in for paint and pipes in houses built before 1950. The Connecticut Department of Public Health says about 15 percent of buildings in the state might still have lead in their paint or pipes.

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