The Two-Way
7:46 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Spurs Beat The Heat In Game 1 Of NBA Finals

Tony Parker of the San Antonio Spurs during Thursday night's first game of the NBA finals in Miami. The Spurs beat the Miami Heat, 92-88.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 8:38 am

So much for a Heat sweep:

"Tim Duncan overcame a slow start to finish with 20 points and 14 rebounds, Tony Parker banked in a desperation jumper on a broken play with 5.2 seconds left and the San Antonio Spurs withstood LeBron James' triple-double to beat the Miami Heat 92-88 on Thursday night in a thrilling Game 1 of the NBA finals." (The Associated Press)

Read more
The Two-Way
7:29 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Book News: The Bible An Unexpected Best-Seller In Norway

Actors on Oslo, Norway, rehearse a scene from Bibelen, a six-hour play based on a nontraditional interpretation of the Bible. Interest in the Bible and biblical stories has surged in secularized Norway.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:24 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Profound Questions About Privacy' Follow Latest Revelations

The National Security Agency's headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.
NSA Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:32 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Glenn Greenwald on the data spy agencies are collecting
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Dina Temple-Raston
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Larry Abramson on the nation's secret court

Fresh reports about the massive amount of electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting "raise profound questions about privacy" because of what they say about how such information will be collected in the future, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston said Friday on Morning Edition.

Read more
It's All Politics
7:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

What Else Has The Longest-Serving Congressman Outlasted?

This photo provided by Rep. John Dingell's office shows Dingell (left) being sworn in by Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn of Texas in 1955.
AP

Originally published on Sat June 8, 2013 11:44 am

Rep. John Dingell made history on Friday, when he surpassed the late Sen. Robert Byrd's record to become the longest-serving member of Congress.

The Michigan Democrat was first elected to the House of Representatives in December 1955, during the first Eisenhower administration. As of Friday, he's served 57 years, five months and 26 days.

Read more

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Robert Smith is a correspondent for NPR's Planet Money where he reports on how the global economy is affecting our lives.

If that sounds a little dry, then you've never heard Planet Money. The team specializes in making economic reporting funny, engaging and understandable. Planet Money has been known to set economic indicators to music, use superheroes to explain central banks, and even buy a toxic asset just to figure it out.

Smith admits that he has no special background in finance or math, just a curiosity about how money works. That kind of curiosity has driven Smith for his 20 years in radio.

Planet Money
3:34 am
Fri June 7, 2013

How To Sell Coke To People Who Have Never Had A Sip

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:05 pm

For years, there were only three countries in the world that didn't officially sell Coca-Cola: Cuba, North Korea and Myanmar, formerly known as Burma.

Now, after 60 years, Coke is back in Myanmar. Sanctions were lifted last year on the country. Just this week, Coca-Cola opened its new bottling plant outside of Yangon. Now all the company has to do is figure out a way to sell all that Coke to people who may not remember what it tastes like.

Read more
The Salt
3:26 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Not Everyone Cheers Turkey's Move To Tighten Alcohol Rules

Diners drinking raki, a traditional Turkish alcoholic drink flavored with anise, at a restaurant in Istanbul.
Jodi Hilton for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 4:46 am

The ongoing anti-government protests in Turkey are about a lot of things — including a recent law to restrict the advertising and sale of alcohol. The limits aren't any more onerous than those in some other Western countries, but secular Turks see them as another step in a push by the ruling party to impose conservative social values on the population

Read more
Law
3:25 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Former Mass. Chief Justice On Life, Liberty And Gay Marriage

Chief Justice Margaret Marshall asks petitioner to explain a point during arguments before the Supreme Judicial Court in Boston in 2005.
George Rizer AP

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:56 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court, on the brink of issuing two same-sex-marriage decisions, is facing a question that Margaret Marshall had to resolve for her state a decade ago, as chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Her decision became the first to legalize same-sex marriage in the United States.

Read more
Parallels
3:24 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Criminals Fleeing Rio Crackdown Set Up Shop In The Suburbs

Rio de Janeiro's Elite Special Forces Police Unit patrols the Caju favela complex as part of the pacification program designed to crack down on crime in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Summer Olympics in 2016.
Lianne Milton for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:27 am

The provincial town of Mage seems a world away from the violence and drug dealing that plague Brazil's larger cities. On a recent afternoon, the central square is a picture of calm. Children play around a fountain; older people sit on the many park benches dotting the area, under the shade of trees.

Mage, about 35 miles northwest of Rio, is close enough that people can commute to the city, which many of them do. Yet it's far enough away that nothing much really happened here in the past. But residents say that is changing.

Read more

Pages