National and International News

Afghan officials say 16 members of the Afghan National Security Forces died in a U.S. airstrike Friday, during operations against Taliban fighters in southern Helmand province. The U.S. says it is investigating the circumstances that led to the mistake.

Afghan media report that 16 members of the security force died, citing local government officials. Although a U.S. statement acknowledging the strike did not specify the number of casualties, a Pentagon spokesman later put the figure at from 12-15 deaths.

Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET

Members of the oldest civil rights organization in the U.S., the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, are heading into their annual meeting with no speaker from the White House and a new interim president and CEO. The meeting started Saturday in Baltimore.

Updated July 22 at 2:03 p.m. ET

The president's eldest son and his former campaign manager have agreed to negotiate with the Senate Judiciary Committee to voluntarily provide documents and to appear behind closed doors. But they are not expected to appear at a hearing of the committee set for Wednesday, the committee's communications director told NPR on Saturday, adding the two men could appear "perhaps at a future hearing."

Meanwhile, the House Intelligence Committee says it wants to interview the president's son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Any self-respecting comics fan cringes at the phrase "comics aren't just for kids anymore." But any self-respecting comics fan also has to admit there are some great kids' comics out there — especially right now.

Before I left for San Diego Comic-Con this week, I checked in with Lucy Strother, a fourth grade teacher in Philadelphia whose students just love comics. "We have like a comics and graphic novels bin in the library and it's perpetually empty because the kids are so obsessed with comics and graphic novels," she says.

Sing Different: Steve Jobs' Life Becomes An Opera

Jul 22, 2017

Mark Campbell is one of the most prolific and celebrated librettists in contemporary American opera. But, as he recently told an audience at the Guggenheim Museum, not everyone thought his latest project was a good idea.

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