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It's All Politics
3:33 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

It May Not Be A Tea Party Year, But Outsiders Are Still Thriving

Georgia Republican Senate candidate David Perdue (left) speaks to supporters at a primary election night party on Tuesday in Atlanta.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 3:50 pm

The prevailing narrative for Tuesday night's GOP primary results was written weeks ago: 2014 will not be another field of dreams for Tea Party insurgents. Wrapping a candidacy in the flag of "Don't Tread on Me" is not the winning tactic it was in many Republican contests two and four years earlier.

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The Salt
3:20 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

The Vegetables Most Americans Eat Are Drowning In Salt And Fat

This isn't exactly what a healthy serving of veggies looks like.
Lauri Patterson iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 5:02 pm

Popeye and our parents have been valiantly trying to persuade us to eat our veggies for decades now.

But Americans just don't eat as many fruits and vegetables as we should. And when we do, they're mainly potatoes and tomatoes — in the not-so-nutritious forms of french fries and pizza, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Natasha Trethewey Ends Her Tenure As U.S. Poet Laureate

As her tenure as U.S. Poet Laureate comes to an end, Natasha Trethewey reflects on her work and poetry in our country today. (W.T. Pfefferle/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 3:13 pm

The role of the United States Poet Laureate is to raise the country’s consciousness about poetry and to spark passion for the craft.

At the conclusion of her two-year tenure as the 19th U.S. Poet Laureate, Pulitzer Prize winner Natasha Trethewey has done that and more.

As her term comes to an end, she joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to reflect on her work, her unique past and the state of poetry today.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Pennsylvania Becomes Latest Gay Marriage State

Peg Welch, center left, and her wife Delma Welch gather with others at a gay marriage rally on the steps of the state Capitol Tuesday, May 20, 2014, in Harrisburg, Pa. Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage was overturned Tuesday by a federal judge in a decision that makes same-sex marriage legal throughout the Northeast. (Matt Rourke/AP)

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 3:28 pm

Pennsylvania’s Republican Governor Tom Corbett says he won’t appeal yesterday’s ruling from a federal judge striking down a state law that banned gay marriage.

Hundreds of gay couples are rushing to get married in the state, which as of today has become the 19th state where gay marriage is legal.

On Monday, a federal judge in Oregon struck down a voter-approved ban on gay marriage and a federal judge in Utah ordered state officials to recognize more than 1,000 gay marriages performed there in the two weeks before the U.S. Supreme Court issued an emergency stay.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Fare-Dodging Movement Strengthens In Sweden

A fare dodger is pictured in this 2011 photo on Planka.nu's Flickr. (Planka.nu/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 3:13 pm

They’re the nemesis of public transportation agencies across the world: fare dodgers. But a growing number say they’re not bandits, rather participants in an important social movement.

Case in point: a group in Stockholm, Sweden, that wants fares to be abolished altogether and transport to be 100 percent tax-funded (it’s currently 50 percent tax-funded).

Alex Berthelsen is a longtime member of that organization, called Planka.nu (roughly translated to “Free-Ride.Now”).

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