NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
6:42 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Shirley Temple Dies; Childhood Movie Star Became Diplomat

Shirley Temple when she was the nation's biggest movie star.
AP

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 10:55 am

  • 'Morning Edition' looks back at the life of Shirley Temple
  • A bit of 'On the Good Ship Lollipop'

Shirley Temple, who charmed the nation as a child movie star in the 1930s and went on to become one of the nation's diplomats in posts that included ambassador to Czechoslovakia during the Cold War, has died.

She was 85.

The Associated Press writes that publicist Cheryl Kagan says the actress, known as Shirley Temple Black in her private life, died late Monday evening at her home near San Francisco. Kagan tells the AP that Temple's family and caregivers were with her.

Read more
Remembrances
6:28 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Shirley Temple Black Dies At 85

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news here this morning. Shirley Temple Black has died. She was 85. She spent her entire life in a way as a child star because of early films that made her so famous and a face of hope during the Great Depression. Alison Bryce reports.

ALISON BRYCE, BYLINE: A bigger star never came in a package so small. She sang and danced her way to super-stardom by the impossible age of six years old. In the year 1934, she acted in nine films, one called "Stand Up And Cheer."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

Read more
NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Study: Stereotypes Drive Perceptions Of Race

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 2:27 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Governments, schools and companies all keep track of your race. The stats they collect are used to track the proportion of blacks and whites who graduate from school, for example. They tell us how many people identify themselves as Native American or Asian. They help us to measure health disparities between races. But there's a problem with all of those statistics and with the deeper way that we think about race. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam is here to explain. Hi, Shankar.

Read more
NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Local Economy Suffers After Afghan Housing Bubble Bursts

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Most Americans who own a house know something about housing bubbles. This country is still recovering from the last one.

MONTAGNE: In Afghanistan, a housing bubble created by the influx of international organizations and their thousands of workers over the past 12 years, is bursting, and it's taking a big bite out of the local economy. NPR's Sean Carberry can hear the last gasp of that bubble on his own street.

Read more
NPR Story
4:55 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Have A Lot Of Free Time? Watch All Of NBC's Olympic Coverage

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NBC says its coverage of the Winter Olympics drew more than 100 million viewers over the last weekend of the Games. That indicates lots of interest, which will fill more than 1,500 hours of coverage across all of NBC's platforms - broadcast network, cable channels and online. With all this coverage and so many ways to watch, we turn to NPR television critic now, Eric Deggans for some tips. Good morning.

ERIC DEGGANS, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: How are fans getting their Olympics coverage these days - for the most part?

Read more

Pages