Charles Lane

Senior reporter for Long Island

Charles is a radio reporter, story teller, Excel ninja, database grasshopper, and loves to FOIL records. He's worked for NPR, Deutche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Soundprint, Penthouse, the Religion News Service, and the Catholic World Report.  He's won three SPJ Public Service Awards, a National Murrow, and was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.  He once did 3Gs in a stunt plane, ran the Tough Mudder, and dove 40 meters on a single breath.  Charles is extraordinarily friendly so don't hesitate to contact.

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$760M increase over 2013
5:52 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

SEC brings record fines for financial wrongdoing

In 2013, Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Chair Mary Jo White established a policy of enforcing low-level offenses to deter larger financial crimes.
Credit AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

The Securities and Exchange Commission says 2014 has brought a record number of fines against traders and others who sought to mislead investors.

This year the commission brought an additional $760 million dollars in fines against wrongdoers, a 22 percent increase compared to year prior. Regulators attribute the increase to smarter use of data and analytical tools to analyze bad behavior.

Also this year, the SEC tried a new approach where more resources are devoted to small infractions in hopes of deterring larger crimes.

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Less stringent rules for startups
6:00 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Lawksy plans softer rules for Bitcoin

New York’s top banking regulator says he plans to relax pending rules set to govern Bitcoin and other virtual currencies. The more startup-friendly requirements come after criticism that the state has moved too quickly to regulate the new technology.

Futurists see virtual currencies as revolutionizing the financial industry the same way the Internet has revolutionized nearly everything.

New York was the first jurisdiction to introduce rules on Bitcoin. Regulators hope to mark the path for other jurisdictions to follow.

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clash of competing styles of architecture
1:56 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

The roof: an architectural divide in the Hamptons

  Caught between federal flood guidelines and local height restrictions, an emotional debate is stirring over the shape of roofs in the Hamptons. The controversy spawned a lawsuit in the village of Southampton that pits the iconic Hamptons cottage against more efficient modern designs.

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Mortgage fraud alleged
6:40 am
Thu October 2, 2014

N.Y. sues law firms in foreclosure scams

N.Y. State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman speaks during the annual meeting of the Business Council of New York State at the Sagamore Resort on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, in Bolton Landing, N.Y.
Credit AP Photo/Mike Groll

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a lawsuit against two law firms Wednesday, alleging they duped 2,700 homeowners out of hundreds of dollars a month in specious legal services.

The two firms have ads running frequently on late night TV claiming the government may have "satisfied in full" a homeowner's mortgage.

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State program still years away
4:55 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

NY asks feds to bring in out-of-state medical marijuana

Politicians and supporters celebrate after New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, center, signed a ceremonial bill to establish a medical marijuana program in New York.
Credit AP Photo/Seth Wenig

New York’s health department is requesting permission from the federal government to import out-of-state marijuana for medical purposes until its in-state program can finish the regulatory process.

In July, New York became the 23rd state to authorize the use of medical marijuana for patients with diseases, including AIDS, cancer and epilepsy. The program requires the health department to write rules and license marijuana production companies. The department says that will take until 2016 to get the program underway.

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