Charles Lane

Senior reporter for Long Island

Charles is a radio reporter, story teller, Excel ninja, database grasshopper, and loves to FOIL records. He's worked for NPR, Deutche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Soundprint, Penthouse, the Religion News Service, and the Catholic World Report.  He's won three SPJ Public Service Awards, a National Murrow, and was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.  He once did 3Gs in a stunt plane, ran the Tough Mudder, and dove 40 meters on a single breath.  Charles is extraordinarily friendly so don't hesitate to contact.

Pages

"This will reverberate through the banking world"
7:12 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

N.Y. jury finds Arab Bank liable for funding terrorism

Attorneys for Arab Bank leave Federal Court in Brooklyn. Shand Stephens, center.
Credit AP Photo/Richard Drew

In a verdict that has far-reaching consequences for global banking, a federal jury in New York has found Arab Bank liable for funding terrorism in Israel between 2000 and 2004.

300 American victims and their families sued the Jordan-based bank, saying they violated the Anti-Terrorism Act by knowingly funding Hamas during the second Intifada. The plaintiffs convinced a jury that the bank gave material support in 24 attacks where Americans were hurt or killed.

This is the first time the Anti-Terrorism Act has been used civilly against a bank.

Read more
"regulators are too slow to catch them"
9:47 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

SEC penalizes first high-frequency trader

May 7, 2010, file photo. Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange the day after the "Flash Crash" and The Dow Jones industrials dropped 1,000 points. The crash brought scrutiny to high-frequency trading and other computerized strategies that move buy and sell orders at blinding speeds.
Credit AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) charged a New York trading firm with the largest fine ever for breaking rules designed to keep risky trades from unraveling the financial system.

It is also the first time the SEC penalized a high-frequency trader.

High-frequency traders, or flash traders, make millions of trades a minute. They are the focus of an ongoing debate over whether those trades make the market function better or exploit slower, traditional traders.

Read more
Cracking down on lenders and debt agencies
5:55 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

New York moves to protect troubled borrowers

Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman proposes reforms to consumer debt cases in state courts with new filing requirements for collectors of so-called "zombie" debts.
Credit AP Photo

In separate actions, New York officials are cracking down on companies taking advantage of troubled borrowers. 

The Department of Financial Services issued subpoenas to nine lending companies in the state Tuesday. The state's bank regulator is investigating them for what are called "loan-to-own" schemes.

Read more
"pattern" of Latino assaults and robberies
8:30 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Riverhead restarts anti-bias task force

Riverhead, N.Y., is restarting its anti-bias task force in order to address a string of violent robberies against Latinos in the town.

Since its inception in 2007, Riverhead's anti-bias task force has met no more than a few times. But town officials and advocates for minorities say the group plans a public meeting later this month in order to discuss what they call a pattern of assaults and robberies directed at Latinos.

Read more
“We’ve all got one hand tied behind our back"
5:46 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Apple Pay, another unregulated business with your data

Reserve System member Daniel Tarullo testifies on Capitol Hill, in Washington Wednesday, June 6, 2012, before the Senate Banking Committee hearing.
Credit AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

On the same day Apple unveiled a new mobile payment system, regulators warned Capitol Hill about the hazards of non-bank companies having access to financial data.

"Ironically," regulators said Tuesday, Home Depot also confirmed the theft of banking data from millions of customers.

Apple says their payment system is designed to be more secure than the one Home Depot uses, but it is also one more company with access to your financial data that’s not subject to government oversight. 

Read more

Pages