Domenico Montanaro

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's lead editor for politics and digital audience. Based in Washington, D.C., he directs political coverage across the network's broadcast and digital platforms.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and has taught high-school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in Journalism from Columbia University

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a die-hard Mets fan and college-basketball junkie.

Know your audience is usually the first rule of public speaking. But that doesn't really seem to matter all that much to President Trump.

Trump became overtly political in yet another setting that some are seeing as over the line — in a speech to the Boy Scouts.

Ironically, Trump began his remarks Monday night promising not to talk about politics.

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It was just five days ago that John McCain, the longtime Arizona senator, two-time presidential candidate and perhaps America's most famous former prisoner of war, was diagnosed with a deadly form of brain cancer.

And yet the Republican lawmaker is set to make a dramatic return to the U.S. Senate on Tuesday for a key vote on health care.

"Look forward to returning to Senate tomorrow," McCain tweeted Monday night.

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President Trump's son-in-law wrote it down. Jared Kushner says he did not collude with Russia during the 2016 election.

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Meghan McCain writes that, of her family members, the one most confident and calm right now is her father.

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Her father is Senator John McCain. And his office says he was diagnosed with brain cancer.

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