Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

Lynne Sladky / AP

On Tuesday the Connecticut House of Representatives passed a bill to bar conversion therapy, the discredited practice of trying to change the sexual orientation of homosexual people to heterosexual. The bill passed by a vote of 141 to 8.

Jessica Hill / AP

Connecticut income tax receipts fell $450 million in April. That’s according to consensus revenue figures released on Monday by Governor Dannel Malloy’s budget office and the state General Assembly’s office of fiscal analysis.

Elise Amendola / AP

Connecticut motorists may soon have to pay tolls again on state highways. That’s because some state lawmakers are looking for new streams of money to fix Connecticut’s budget. Other lawmakers oppose this move. They call it a money grab. They promise to block any legislation promoting tolls.

MaxVT / Flickr

In Connecticut, state budget talks fell apart Tuesday after Democratic legislative committee leaders rejected fellow Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy’s plans on pensions and education funding.

Courtesy of H. John Voorhees III / Hearst Connecticut Media

Ebong Udoma, WSHU’s senior political reporter, recently met Leymah Gbowee, the Liberian peace activist, when she was in Connecticut for the PeaceJam event at Western Connecticut State University. Gbowee received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 for leading the women’s movement that helped end Liberia’s second civil war.

Pages