Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

Office of the Connecticut Secretary of the State

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill is predicting a higher than normal voter turnout in the state this November because of increased public interest in the presidential election. She says her office is making plans to ensure that problems that happened in past elections, such as not having enough ballots at some polling places, won’t happen this year.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

The two women on the Connecticut Congressional Delegation, Democrats Elizabeth Esty and Rosa DeLauro, say they are not giving up on efforts to get the U.S. House of Representatives to vote on gun control legislation. They were speaking at an event on Wednesday at the UConn Medical Center in Farmington, which was organized by Esty to mark a ‘National Day of Action’ to prevent gun violence.

Ebong Udoma / WSHU

This week’s 25-hour sit-in on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives highlights the ongoing problem of getting gun control legislation through Congress. 

Twenty years ago, following a dramatic rise in urban homicides caused by the crack cocaine epidemic, Congress failed to take action on an assault weapons ban.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

The sit-in on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives attracted the participation of all members of the Connecticut Congressional delegation, including Representative Elizabeth Esty, whose district includes Newtown.

Johnathon Henninger

Connecticut state lawmakers appear to be distancing themselves from Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy this election year. On Monday members of the General Assembly voted to override three of the governor’s vetoes. It’s the first time a Malloy veto has been overridden since the governor took office five years ago.

Pages