Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

Ann Lopez / WSHU

New York City filmmaker Kim Snyder’s documentary, “Newtown,” tells the story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history. On December 14, 2012, 20 first graders and six educators were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School, in Newtown.

ccPixs.com / Flickr

It's been 25 years since Connecticut lawmakers passed a universal state income tax. According to the Yankee Institute, a conservative think tank in Hartford, the state has taken in about $126 billion through income taxes since 1991. The Institute says in that time state government spending has grown dramatically and much of that revenue has been used for debt servicing and public employee benefits.

Office of Conn. State Rep. Roberta Willis

Many Connecticut veteran lawmakers are deciding to sit out the 2016 campaign season. Most are not running for office because they've had their fill of partisan politics. It's the culmination of tough legislative sessions in which state lawmakers have had to grapple with growing state budget deficits. 

Ann Lopez / WSHU

U.S. Representative Jim Himes, D-CT4, is encouraging people in the tri-state area to go about their normal business despite the bomb explosions in New York City and New Jersey over the weekend.

Ann Lopez / WSHU

John Shaban, the Republican running against Connecticut 4th District Democratic Congressman Jim Himes, opened his campaign headquarters in Bridgeport on Thursday.