Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

Sait Serkan Gurbuz / AP

U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., has joined the state’s consumer advocate in urging the federal government to reign in the high cost of electricity transmission in New England, saying it’s outpacing increases in the rest of the country.

Blumenthal says electricity transmission costs in Connecticut have increased nearly 600 percent since 2000.

AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File

Indianapolis-based Anthem Inc. is defending its request for a nearly 27 percent rate increase in 2017 for Connecticut subscribers to its individual health insurance plans. Anthem officials made their case in Hartford on Wednesday.

Anthem’s individual plans cover about 56,700 Connecticut residents.

Scott Jackson, the commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Labor, said Monday that his department is using its database to find unemployed and underemployed veterans for advanced manufacturing programs.

“Veterans emerged as a group that we could really reach out to in a very targeted way and they are folks that we need to reach out to because we owe it to them for their service.” Jackson said.

Former marine John Jenner, an instructor at Three Rivers Community College in Norwich, said vets have skills well suited for manufacturing.

(AP Photo/Bob Child)

State Comptroller Kevin Lembo is projecting that Connecticut ended the 2016 fiscal year on June 30th $279 million in the red. That’s about a $36 million improvement on what Lembo had predicted last month.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

On Wednesday night, at the Democratic National Convention, U. S. Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn., joined family members of victims of gun violence, including the Sandy Hook School shooting, to advocate for stronger federal gun control laws.  

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