Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

Jessica Hill / AP

Connecticut lawmakers have rescheduled Friday’s special session for Monday because of the snow. The lawmakers want to use the session to restore funding to a program that helps elderly and disabled state residents cover Medicare expenses. 

Bob Child / AP

Bridgeport, Connecticut, Mayor Joe Ganim filed paperwork with the State Elections Enforcement Commission in Hartford on Wednesday to launch his campaign for governor. 

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Connecticut U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy say the $81 billion in disaster relief funds being considered for Florida, Texas, California, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands is not enough.

Sage Ross / Flickr

Connecticut lawmakers return to the state Capitol on Thursday to continue with a special session aimed at restoring funding to a program that helps about 113,000 elderly and disabled state residents cover Medicare-related expenses.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Lt. Governor Nancy Wyman says Connecticut won’t be able to afford its Husky Health program for children if Congress fails to renew the Children’s Health Insurance Program, CHIP, that pays for it.

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