Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

Ebong is WSHU’s award winning Connecticut State Capitol reporter.  He worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative and he is a regular contributor of spot news to NPR.   Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the US Senate. He has also covered several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News. Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post.

Conn. Comptroller's Office

Connecticut Comptroller Kevin Lembo wants the state to change the way it puts away money for a rainy day.

Much of Connecticut’s rainy day fund depends of a volatile source – the sometimes higher than expected revenues generated by corporations and the state’s wealthiest residents, who make money on Wall Street, and file quarterly returns, Lembo said.

"Historically, the way we make a deposit into the rainy day fund is we wait until the end of the year and we see what’s left and then, maybe, most, or all of it gets deposited into the rainy day fund,” said Lembo.

The Public Utility Regulatory Authority has issued a draft decision to redesign electric bills so that customers can easily see the rate they are being charged.

PURA is responding to legislation passed last year after thousands of customers complained that they were taken advantage of by third-party electricity suppliers, who offered variable rates.

The first page of the redesigned bills would have both the third-party supplier’s rate and the standard rate offered by Connecticut Light & Power and United Illuminating.

AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File

Connecticut’s utility regulators would like their agency to once again be independent. The agency used to be known as the Department of Public Utility Control, until four years ago. That's when Governor Dannel Malloy changed the name to Public Utility Regulatory Authority, or PURA, and placed it under the state’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Malloy said he did that in an effort to make government more efficient.

AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb

The Connecticut Supreme Court has rejected what’s called the mature minor doctrine. The doctrine holds that some minors are mature enough to make their own health care decisions. The ruling came on Thursday in the case of a 17-year-old girl, known in court documents as Cassandra C.

The high court ruled that the state of Connecticut is not violating Cassandra C’s rights by forcing her to undergo cancer chemotherapy that she does not want.

AP Photo/Jessica Hill

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy used his state of the state speech on Wednesday to push for a 30-year plan to overhaul the state’s entire transportation infrastructure.

The comprehensive plan would cost billions of dollars but Malloy says the state cannot afford to wait.  The Democratic governor gave the speech shortly after being sworn-in for his second term.

Pages