Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

The state Senate in Connecticut has approved a new satellite casino to be built in East Windsor by a joint partnership of the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes. The measure passed 24-12 early Wednesday morning, marking a big step in a potential expansion of gambling in the state. 

One of the major ratings agencies has downgraded Connecticut’s general obligation bonds, making it more expensive for the state to borrow money. Fitch Ratings downgraded the state from A+ to AA-. 

As Connecticut wrestles with the question of re-introducing highway tolls, Democrats and Republicans are at odds about whether the idea is feasible. A bill which would include tolls as a revenue raising source for transportation has already passed out of committee, and will be debated by the full House and Senate. 

Pharmaceutical giant Alexion announced it will cut jobs in coming months. The New Haven-based company said the restructuring will affect 210 people, or about seven percent of its workforce.

Connecticut's congressional delegation joined the call for action over allegations that Attorney General Jeff Sessions lied during testimony in his confirmation hearings.

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