Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Three members of Connecticut's congressional delegation have been denied access to visit migrant children being cared for in the state on behalf of the federal Department Health and Human Services.

People in several cities around Connecticut joined a day of action Saturday to protest the federal government’s continued separation of migrant families. 

It appears Connecticut's proposed third casino in East Windsor may be one step closer. The Department of the Interior says it's about to issue an approval for the amendment of the financial compact that the state has with the Mohegan Tribe.

Gov. Malloy Signs Bump Stock Ban Into Law

May 31, 2018
Rick Bowmer / AP

Governor Dannel Malloy signed a bill into law today banning bump stocks in Connecticut.

Connecticut is one of the first states to join a new effort to combat the opioid crisis. MedicineSafe aims to coordinate the efforts of many different agencies in keeping addictive painkillers out of the wrong hands.

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