Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Pharmaceutical giant Alexion announced it will cut jobs in coming months. The New Haven-based company said the restructuring will affect 210 people, or about seven percent of its workforce.

Connecticut's congressional delegation joined the call for action over allegations that Attorney General Jeff Sessions lied during testimony in his confirmation hearings.

The New London public school system hopes to pass an emergency policy this week that will safeguard undocumented children on school campuses in the city. Meanwhile, hundreds of people turned out at a community forum organized by the school district Monday night. 

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini continues to make headlines with his frank views. Wednesday, one day after announcing the end of his company's merger plans with Humana, he had some choice words for the Wall Street Journal, when asked about the future of Obamacare.

At least one of the health insurance industry's mega mergers is off for good. Aetna and Humana said Tuesday they will not appeal the judge's ruling in the recently decided anti-trust case, which denied their $34 billion tie-up. Hartford-based Aetna will now pay Humana a $1 billion break-up fee.

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