Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Hans Pennink / AP

After an embarrassing controversy over stipend payments, the beleaguered group of breakaway Democrats in the State Senate are trying to change the subject.

Karen DeWitt/WAMC

Several senators who are part of a breakaway group of Democrats known as the Independent Democratic Conference were paid extra stipends – ranging from $12,500 to $18,000 a year – for serving on various Senate committees controlled by the majority party Republicans.

Courtesy of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo / Flickr

A new online ad featuring Governor Cuomo and promoting tolerance has once again fueled talk that New York’s governor may be planning a presidential run. There are some questions, though, about the ad and its donors.

The ad, which for now is only running online, features Cuomo and several well-known actors including Steve Buscemi and Whoopi Goldberg. All claim to be something other than they actually are, in order to promote the message of unity and tolerance in a diverse state.

Mike Groll / AP

Voters get a chance to decide in the fall whether the state should have a constitutional convention. Both legislative leaders say, though, they are against it.

Hans Pennink / AP

Some lawmakers are pressing the state’s comptroller to divest the state’s pension fund from the fossil fuel industry. But Comptroller Tom DiNapoli says he believes he can be more effective in changing the company’s behavior by acting from the inside.

Pages