Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Evan Vucci / AP

According to a new poll, New Yorkers are evenly split on whether President Donald Trump will be good or bad for the state.

Mike Groll / AP

Governor Cuomo, D-N.Y., is pressuring state lawmakers to come back in December for a special session that includes a number of reform items to address recent corruption scandals. He says in exchange, they could potentially be rewarded with a pay raise.   

Office of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Governor Cuomo on Sunday took a number of steps that he says are in reaction to the divisiveness in the nation that has intensified since the presidential election. Cuomo, without mentioning President-elect Donald Trump by name, said the “ugly discourse” has made him “soul sick” for America. And he says there have been several instances in New York, including swastikas painted on a subway train and in a Buffalo suburb, along with a KKK flier placed on cars on Long Island.

Mike Groll / AP

Governor Cuomo is adopting a more conciliatory tone toward president-elect Donald Trump, after Cuomo called Trump “un- New York” in the final days of the campaign.

Cuomo, in the final days of the campaign, stumped for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in New York, and heavily criticized Donald Trump.

Pete Dzintars / Flickr

If the numbers hold, Republicans are poised to remain in control of the state Senate, and even pick up a seat. The news has reassured business groups but dismayed reform advocates.

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