Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Ross D. Franklin / AP

New Yorkers who sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act exchanges for individuals will see their premiums rise by an average of 14 percent, now that the Cuomo administration has approved rate increases for insurers in the exchanges. Part of the increase is due to worries and uncertainties over the future of the ACA, also known as Obamacare.

Mike Groll / AP

There’s growing pressure on a group of breakaway Democrats in the State Senate to reunite with the mainstream Democrats and form a majority to rule the Senate.

Office of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Governor Cuomo signed into law a measure that would create new penalties for people who make bomb threats against community centers. The action stems from bomb threats made to Jewish Community Centers in New York and around the nation last winter.

Mike Groll / AP

The former EPA regional administrator under President Obama says scientists who leaked the report on further evidence of climate change to the New York Times should be commended as “whistleblowers.”

Andrew Harnik / AP

The state Board of Elections quietly voted this week to turn over some data on New York’s voters to a Trump administration panel looking at whether there was mass voter fraud in the 2016 presidential election. The move makes New York the first state to comply with the controversial request, after officials initially said they would resist the request.

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