Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Kevin P. Coughlin / Office of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo

Governor Cuomo, one day after Democratic victories in elections in New York State and the nation, is calling on warring democratic factions in the State Senate to unify.

Bebeto Matthews / AP

Supporters of holding a constitutional convention to fix problems in state government say they are disappointed with the resounding defeat of the measure in Tuesday’s voting, but they say they are not giving up.

Mark Lennihan / AP

The ballot proposition on whether to hold a state constitutional convention was soundly defeated in Tuesday’s election. But a second question of whether to strip pensions from convicted lawmakers was approved.

Alexander F. Yuan / AP

Municipal elections are being held around the region on Tuesday.

In Connecticut, city and town candidates range from mayor to school board.

Voter turnout for off-year municipal elections is typically low, roughly about 30 percent, but Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill says this year could be different because of strong interests in some of the races, including mayoral races in New Haven and New Britain.

David Klepper / AP

Governor Cuomo and New York Senator Chuck Schumer are once again warning that New Yorkers will be hurt if the Republican tax overhaul plan in Congress is approved.

Schumer, who is Senate Democratic leader, says while the tax plan has changed from the original version, 71 percent of the deductions that now benefit state residents would be eliminated. The plan would end deductions for state and local income taxes, and cap the property tax deduction at $10,000 a year.  

“The plan will increase taxes on New Yorkers by $16 billion,” Schumer said in a joint conference call with Cuomo.

Cuomo says the plan would undo seven years of work that his administration has done to keep taxes and spending steady in New York.

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