Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Pete Dzintars / Flickr

Democrats had hoped to make inroads into the state Senate, but preliminary results show the Republicans gaining one seat to hold a razor thin 32-seat majority.

Mike Groll / AP

Recommendations on how to go forward with some of Governor Cuomo’s economic development contracts tainted by scandal have been delayed for another few weeks, says Howard Zemsky, Buffalo businessman and the governor’s economic development chair.

Zemsky is trying to pick up the pieces after nine criminal complaints have been issued against two former Cuomo associates, including a top former aide, along with the former head of SUNY Polytechnic, who oversaw the contracts for the Buffalo Billion and other projects.  

Courtesy of Pixabay

If the New York State Senate is controlled by Democrats after the election, there could be some differences over taxing and spending policies. Many Democrats favor extending an income tax surcharge on millionaires when it expires next spring.

Pete Dzintars / Flickr

There’s a greater chance than ever that the Senate could be dominated by Democrats after the November 8 election. Many issues stalled in the Republican-led Senate for years would now have a possibility of passing.

Nathaniel Brooks / The New York Times via AP

New York’s senior Senator Charles Schumer, in the only debate with his opponent, attorney Wendy Long,  says he’s “appalled” by FBI Director James Comey’s actions, including the decision announced Friday to reexamine emails from Hillary Clinton’s top aide for evidence of misuse of classified materials.

Pages