Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Tuesday’s presidential primaries in New York have been getting a lot of media attention. But there is also a local election on Long Island that day.

It’s the special election to replace New York State Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos, a Rockville Republican, who lost his seat last December after being convicted of corruption.

WSHU’s senior political reporter Ebong Udoma spoke with New York State Capitol Reporter Karen DeWitt about the upcoming elections.

(AP Photo/Jonathan Bachman)

A new poll finds that Bernie Sanders has narrowed the gap with Hillary Clinton in the New York Presidential primary race, but Clinton leads in key voting regions.

Richard Drew / AP

The new state budget has been in place for nearly a week, but little attention has been paid to many of the items that are in it. A government reform group says that’s by design.

As soon as the state spending plan was passed, Governor Andrew Cuomo made the most of two items that have received the greatest public attention: a graduated increase in the state’s minimum wage, and a future paid family leave program, to take full effect in several years.

The budget passed on a Friday night. By Monday morning Cuomo was at a political rally touting his successes.

Karen DeWitt / WSHU

Fracktivists, as anti-fracking activists are called, hope to play a role in New York’s presidential primary. Activists are asking Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, as well as Republican candidates, to take a stand against the Constitution Pipeline and other natural gas pipelines, that if approved could crisscross the state. 

Mike Groll / AP

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton talked a lot about the economy when she spoke at a rally at Cohoes High School in Cohoes, N.Y. on Monday night.

Pages