Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Mike Groll / AP

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is one of many condemning Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for his statements in the 2005 incident, where he spoke of women in vulgar terms, and described actions that many view as sexual assault.

Kathy Willens / AP

Speaking at a panel on corruption in state government at the College of Saint Rose in Albany, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara took a shot at some of Governor Andrew Cuomo's actions. Without mentioning Cuomo by name, Bharara seemed to criticize the governor’s actions. 

Office of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Some environmental groups say Governor Cuomo’s administration should reconsider an $8 billion bailout of three upstate nuclear power plants. They say the cost will be passed on to ratepayers.

Mike Groll / AP

The scandal over Governor Cuomo’s economic development programs has led to more scrutiny of whether the projects are the best way to improve the state’s economy, and some watchdog groups are asking questions.

Mark Lennihan / AP

Governor Cuomo says much of the responsibility for the alleged corruption scandal touching his administration is on the State University, specifically SUNY Polytechnic Institute, which oversaw many of the contracts. But reform groups say the governor is not telling the whole story.