Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Courtesy of Pixabay

A fiscal watchdog group is questioning New York’s century-old prevailing wage law for construction workers, saying it unnecessarily costs taxpayers billions of dollars a year in added expenses for big road, bridge, and other projects.

Pete Dzintars / Flickr

State lawmakers are due back at the Capitol Monday, following a two-week break after they passed a budget that contained numerous other items, like free public college tuition for some middle class students and an expansion of ride hailing services. Here’s a look at what, if anything, lawmakers still need to do before adjourning in June.

Office of N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo

A residency requirement for college students seeking free tuition at New York’s public colleges is drawing criticism. Governor Cuomo defends the late addition to the plan, approved as part of the state budget earlier this month.

Hans Pennink / AP

Brian Kolb is the New York State Assembly minority leader, but he’s not part of the closed door budget negotiations underway in Albany.  

Office of N.Y. Assemblywoman Patricia A. Fahy / Facebook

With lawmakers in Albany preoccupied with getting the budget done by week’s end, groups have to get creative to gain attention. Supporters of spending for public defense for the poor came up with one way – a Wheel of Fortune-style game staged right in the middle of the action.

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