Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Karen DeWitt

A New York comedian who is also an activist on prison rights issues is drawing attention to the state’s practice of investing a small amount of its pension fund in the private prison industry.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

A new poll finds Governor Cuomo’s campaign for a phased in $15 an hour minimum wage is resonating among his base group of supporters. The Siena poll also finds the governor’s job approval rating is still at near record low levels.

(AP Photo/Jonathan Bachman)

A new poll finds that, for the first time, Hillary Clinton is viewed negatively by a slim majority of New Yorkers.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

The leader of New York State’s Business Council said her group will fight Governor Andrew Cuomo’s plan to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour, but concedes that the legislation may become law soon.


The teachers' union and its allies will protest outside the state’s annual Business Council meeting in Lake George on Wednesday. The union is upset over a speech to be given by former CNN anchor and now charter school advocate Campbell Brown.

Brown is the featured speaker at the yearly event, at the posh Sagamore resort on Lake George. It often features top politicians, but seldom attracts demonstrations.