Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990.  She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Mike Groll / AP

Governor Andrew Cuomo, who has offered only lukewarm support in the past for his fellow Democrats in their quest to take over the State Senate, this week said he would back Democratic candidates in Senate races. Cuomo also somewhat reluctantly offered support to his former primary rival, Zephyr Teachout, who is now running for Congress.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Supporters of the two outsider candidates in the presidential race are finding obstacles to attending the national conventions in Philadelphia and Cleveland, to be held during the next couple of weeks.

New York State Center for Rural Schools

It’s summer vacation for schoolchildren, but leaders of New York’s rural schools are worrying about the new school year, and say they are squeezed by a tax cap and other factors.

Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

One of the centerpieces of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s economic development plans has created just a small number of jobs so far, but the governor is urging patience.

Mike Groll / AP

It’s been 10 years since New York’s highest court ordered that more state money be paid to schools with the poorest children, but advocates say in the decade since the 2006 ruling, many so-called “high needs” schools have fallen even further behind.

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