Mark Herz

WSHU All Things Considered host, reporter

Mark started his romance with journalism in his last year at Yale, where he majored in linguistics. Then, it was on to Columbia for a M.S. at the Graduate School of Journalism, where he reported from ground zero on Sept. 11. A Connecticut native, he was also a newspaper and public radio reporter for a time in Northern Arizona. Mark has won numerous state, regional, and national awards for both his reporting and interviewing. During his time at WSHU he's won national awards in 2013 and 2012. And in 2011, he won a National Edward R. Murrow Award for his series, "Policing the Mentally Ill.”

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A Talk With Peter Yarrow
9:02 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

50 Years Of Peter, Paul And Mary

This 1980 photo shows, from left: Mary Travers, Paul Stookey and Peter Yarrow. Travers, one-third of the popular 1960s folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary, died Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2009 in a Connecticut hospital after battling leukemia for several years. She was 72.
Credit AP Photo

Peter, Paul and Mary, the iconic folk group of the 1960s, were renowned for their harmonies and their activism.  The group has a new book out,  Peter, Paul and Mary: 50 Years of Music and Life.

WSHU's Mark Herz spoke with Peter Yarrow about the group and its legacy.

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Transportation
11:48 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

NTSB: More Attention Needs To Be Paid To Sleep Disorders

An Amtrak train, top, traveling on an unaffected track, passes a derailed Metro North commuter train, Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013 in the Bronx borough of New York.
Credit AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

In December of 2013, an engineer fell asleep while driving a Metro-North train in the Bronx.  It derailed, killing 4 people. 

The NTSB released a report on Wednesday with safety recommendations.  Among those recommendations is that railroads should routinely screen employees who perform "safety-sensitive" functions for sleep disorders.

NTSB Chairman Christopher Hart says they've made the recommendation to regulators of all transportation industries. He says, for example, it’s been helpful for the trucking industry.

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Lear's sitcoms broke new ground in the '70s
6:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

A Talk with TV Iconoclast Norman Lear

Norman Lear brought unexpected depth to sitcoms. He says, "Comedy always sits right next to tragedy."
Credit Alex J. Berliner / ABImages

Connecticut native Norman Lear changed the face of TV. And he did it in part by changing the faces on TV.

On his groundbreaking sitcoms, he brought us the bigoted Archie Bunker of All in the Family, a brash feminist in Maude, the upwardly mobile African-American The Jeffersons, and the struggling Black family in the projects of Good Times—and that’s just to name a very few.

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Masters & Johnson explored
1:58 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

'Masters of Sex' author Thomas Maier discusses Masters & Johnson, Showtime series

Bill Masters and Virginia Johnson (left) pose for a photo in San Francisco in 1972. Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan (right) portray Masters and Johnson in the Showtime series Masters of Sex.
Credit AP Images

Showtime's Masters of Sex is in its second season. The show dramatizes the lives of pioneering sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson. Actress Lizzy Caplan was nominated for a Primetime Emmy for her role as Virginia Johnson.

Biographer Thomas Maier wrote the book Masters of Sex, which the TV series is based on. He lives and works on Long Island, where in addition to being an author, he's an investigative reporter for Newsday. He spoke with WSHU's Mark Herz.

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Why the "dropped stitch" reveals, intrigues
10:13 am
Fri August 15, 2014

Dani Shapiro on the "perils and pleasures" of creating

Novelist and memoirist Dani Shapiro. She says what keeps us alive, and able to create, is what choreographer Martha Graham called "a queer divine dissatisfaction."
Credit Kate Uhry

All of us may love when a feeling of inspiration infuses our work. Best-selling novelist and memoirist Dani Shapiro looks back on 20 years of facing the blank page—and teaching others about her craft—and says she's learned that for us all it's really about showing up, and following a trail of "breadcrumbs through a forest," as it were.

WSHU's Mark Herz talks to Shapiro about her latest book, Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of a Creative Life.

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