Mark Herz

WSHU All Things Considered host, senior editor

Mark started his romance with journalism in his last year at Yale, where he majored in linguistics. Then, it was on to Columbia for a M.S. at the Graduate School of Journalism, where he reported from ground zero on Sept. 11. A Connecticut native, he was also a newspaper and public radio reporter for a time in Northern Arizona. Mark has won numerous state, regional, and national awards for both his reporting and interviewing. During his time at WSHU he's won national awards in 2013 and 2012. And in 2011, he won a National Edward R. Murrow Award for his series, "Policing the Mentally Ill.”

The number of complaints of sexual misconduct at Yale University is at its highest level since the school started releasing semi-annual reports in 2011.

Yale started issuing the reports as part of a voluntary agreement with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.

The agreement followed a complaint alleging that a sexually hostile environment existed at Yale, and that the university had not responded in a prompt and adequate manner.

The latest report released this week includes 78 complaints that were brought to the university’s attention.

Meredith Miller / Beinecke Digital Studio

The Windham Campbell Literary Prizes Festival wrapped up at Yale University last week. Nine prizewinners from around the globe in drama, non-fiction, and fiction were surprised with the prestigious awards that grant them $150,000 each.

(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

The contentious Bush-era education law known as ‘No Child Left Behind’ is possibly going to get an overhaul.  No Child Left Behind had forced states to test all children, and held schools accountable when low scores stayed low.

(AP Photo/Tim Roske)

New York lawmakers have ended one of the state’s most turbulent legislative sessions. It was marked by the resignation of both its leaders over federal corruption scandals.

The session dragged on for an extra week as Governor Andrew Cuomo, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, and Senate leader John Flanagan spent days negotiating agreements on several contentious key issues, like the state's property tax cap and an education tax credit.

(AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

New York State Government is famous for its “three men in a room” way of doing business.  The three men are the Governor, the Assembly Speaker, and the Leader of the State Senate. 

This week there’s a new incarnation of the three men in a room.   

That’s because Republican Dean Skelos of Long Island resigned as leader of the state senate on Monday after being brought up on federal corruption charges.   He was replaced by a fellow Long Islander, Republican John Flanagan. 

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