NPR Staff

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFi-r8yLWPc http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUn4GJjflcA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shCKghKa1rA It has been a week since a massive fire in Oakland, Calif., claimed the lives of 36 people at a party in a warehouse. "Ghost Ship," as the space was known, was an artist community and music venue, and many of the people who attended the concert the night of last week's deadly fire were up-and-coming electronic music artists. Among those who died that night are...

It's been nearly a year since Mayor Karen Weaver declared a state of emergency in Flint, Mich. Before she became mayor, the city switched its water supply to the Flint River in a cost-cutting measure. The water wasn't properly treated, which caused corrosion in old pipes — leaching lead and other toxins into the city's tap water. People were afraid to drink or even bathe in the water. Since then, a lot has happened. Charges were brought against several Michigan state officials and one Flint...

Thirty years ago, a new face debuted on daytime television: Oprah Winfrey. The new podcast, "Making Oprah," produced by member station WBEZ, chronicles Oprah's rise to stardom. Journalist Jenn White tells Oprah's story from her early days on her first talk show, AM Chicago , through to the biggest, most outrageous moments when 40 million people a week were watching her national show. It began with a station manager in Chicago, Dennis Swanson. He was the one who spotted something in the young...

Fake news played a bigger role in this past presidential election than ever seen before. And sometimes it has had serious repercussions for real people and businesses. That's what happened to a pizzeria in Washington, D.C., recently, when an armed man claiming to be "self-investigating" a fake news story entered the restaurant and fired off several rounds. But once a fake news story is out there, and the harm has been done, what can a person do about it? Derigan Silver, a professor of media,...

We like to think our brains can make rational decisions — but maybe they can't. The way risks are presented can change the way we respond, says best-selling author Michael Lewis. In his new book, The Undoing Project, Lewis tells the story of Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, two Israeli psychologists who made some surprising discoveries about the way people make decisions. Along the way, they also founded an entire branch of psychology called behavioral economics. Lewis is also the author of...

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