Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.


7:53 am
Sun March 15, 2015

From Afghanistan's Rubble, A Teacher Builds A School Of Ideas

Aziz Royesh is one of 10 finalists for the $1 million Global Teacher Prize.
Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 3:44 pm

Aziz Royesh is a man whose life has been defined by one over-arching ambition: He says he simply wants to be a teacher.

At 46, he has achieved that goal in one of the most difficult and dangerous environments in the world — Afghanistan. He has also founded a school that is now winning international acclaim as a model for education in that war-battered nation.

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5:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

New Defense Secretary Makes Unannounced Trip To Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 7:21 pm

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4:07 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

At His Villa, Pakistan's Musharraf Awaits Trial And Holds Court

Former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf speaks to the media in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on March 24, 2013, shortly before ending his self-imposed exile and returning to his homeland. He now faces murder and treason charges in Pakistan, but is free on bail and living in a villa in Karachi.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 7:08 pm

He is indicted for treason and murder. He is forbidden from going abroad. He is banned for life from running for elected office.

It is hard to imagine how Pervez Musharraf, former military ruler of Pakistan, could be in much deeper water than this.

Yet, as the ex-president and army chief sits in his apricot-colored villa, ruminating over his predicament, he does not sound — or look — much like a man unduly burdened by worry.

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Middle East
4:00 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

As Pakistan Turns Courts Over To Military, Some Fear Revival Of Army's Power

Originally published on Mon February 16, 2015 7:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



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5:02 am
Mon February 2, 2015

The Theft Of An Infant Son: In Pakistan, A Not-Uncommon Crime

Shazia and Ziaullah Khan's baby boy was stolen from a hospital ward in Islamabad, Pakistan.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 2:20 pm

Individual tragedies easily go unnoticed in Pakistan. People are too busy grappling with corruption, militant violence, poverty and an infrastructure so dysfunctional that everyone, everywhere endures daily power outages.

Ziaullah Khan and his wife, Shazia, are the victims of one of the cruelest crimes of all. Yet in this troubled land, they're struggling to get anyone to listen — let alone help.

A Stolen Baby Boy

They're a young couple, just starting out. She's a teacher; he works in a print shop. They live in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

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