Tom Kuser

Program Director, WSHU Morning Edition host

Tom has been with WSHU since 1987, after spending 15 years at college and commercial radio and television stations. After a short stint as classical music announcer, he was given the task of rebuilding and expanding the news department. Under his direction, the news staff began a tradition of award-winning coverage. Tom has won several Associated Press awards for his own feature reporting, too. He became Program Director in 1999, and has been local host of NPR’s Morning Edition since 2000.

Ann Lopez / WSHU

The recent deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, by a 19-year-old former student has brought not only gun control into the national conversation again, but also the effectiveness of mental health care. Signals given off by the disturbed young man, who has confessed to police, might have connected him to the help he needed before the attack on the school. But they didn’t. 

Jessica Hill / AP

Connecticut lawmakers return to the State Capitol in Hartford for the 2018 legislative session on Wednesday. Highway tolls and fixing the state’s budget deficit are expected to be at the top of their agenda.

Part of my daily routine in the 1960s and early ‘70s was tearing into the newspaper comic section. Well actually, Dad was always the first to touch the Bridgeport Post. Then I got to look at the funnies. Beetle Bailey, Henry, Nancy, Prince Valiant, They’ll Do It Every Time, and a dozen others.  

What I didn’t know until just recently was that many of those cartoonists lived and worked in Fairfield County, Connecticut. Author Cullen Murphy grew up in that tight-knit community. His father, John Cullen Murphy, drew the popular comic strips, Prince Valiant and Big Ben Bolt.   

Haraz N. Ghanbari / AP

Ted Koppel was the host of Nightline, the groundbreaking TV news program that chronicled the Iran hostage crisis day after day, starting in late 1979. It was the kind of coverage that has evolved to the 24/7 news cycle that we see today, for better or worse.

Koppel’s career has ranged from copyboy to war reporter to international correspondent. Koppel recently sat down with Morning Edition Host Tom Kuser to discuss the state of journalism today.

Darron Cummings / AP

Next week on Election Day, New Yorkers will decide whether or not to hold a constitutional convention. If they say yes, it will be the first one in about 80 years and would open up the state's constitution to revision.

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