Ask Me Another

  • Hosted by Ophira Eisenberg

NPR's exciting new show featuring puzzles, word games and trivia played in front of a live audience. Ask Me Another is a co-production of NPR and WNYC. 

You can join in on the fun on Saturdays at noon on 91.1 WSHU, 89.9 WSUF, 103.3 WQQQ, 1260 WSHU and 1340 WYBC.

Just Saying

Oct 7, 2016

There are some expressions we use all the time that don't seem to make a whole lot of sense. For example, the saying to "pull out all the stops" is actually a reference to pipe organs; stops control the flow of air through an organ's pipes, and when you pull out all the stops, you can play all the pipes at maximum volume. In this game, Jonathan and Ophira quiz contestants on the supposed origin story of commonly-used phrases.

Sharing Pairing

Sep 23, 2016

In this final round, every answer is a rhyming pair of words. The second word is created by changing the first letter of the first word. For example, if we said, "a non-competitive race for charity," you'd answer, "Fun Run."

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Sep 23, 2016

Natasha Lyonne premiered three movies in two weeks--Yoga Hosers, a Kevin Smith comedy/horror film about two girls who fight Canadian Nazis in the form of sausages; Antibirth, a horror farce about a party girl who finds herself pregnant with a demon after a crazy night; and Intervention, about a group of friends who come together to give a couple a marriage intervention. "That's my genre," she told host Ophira Eisenberg, of the off-beat projects she's been involved in.

Mr. Mojo Risin'

Sep 23, 2016

Strap in, everybody, because it's time for ANAGRAMS ON THE RADIO! We decided to inject a little rock-n-roll into our anagram game by adding the most famous anagrammed name in rock — Mr. Mojo Risin', the anagram for The Doors' lead singer Jim Morrison. The answer we're looking for is an anagram of the last word you hear. It's like we're giving you the answers!

Heard on Natasha Lyonne: Random Houses

Comedians often have a moment in childhood that, in hindsight, shapes them into a comic. For Cameron Esposito it may have been that, as a kid, she wore an eyepatch for eight years to correct her crossed eyes. "Yea, so it wasn't really a moment, as [it was] an entire childhood," she told host Ophira Eisenberg. "Just imagine a little sweetie Cammy Esposito: she's got an eye patch, she's got a bowl-cut, she's got glasses and braces. That's right--glasses on top of an eye patch!"