Here & Now

  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Public radio's live midday news program offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

Keep abreast of what's happening Here & Now weekdays at 1 p.m. on 89.9 WSUF, 103.3 WQQQ, 1260 WSHU and 1340 WYBC.

Prosecutors dropped the remaining charges against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. The move comes after three other officers were not convicted.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent, about the case.

Guest

Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent. She tweets @jenniferludden.

There was one shooting every six hours on average last year in Philadelphia. In the past 10 years, more than 14,500 shootings occurred, with at least 2,600 killed by guns — many of whom were black residents.

While some see the numbers as a reason to increase gun control, others see things differently.

Yuri Zalzman of North Philadelphia’s The Gun Range and Maj Toure of the activist group Black Guns Matter have come together to try to find solutions.

Donald Trump ended his speech at the Republican National Convention last night with the phrase that has become the central one of his campaign: “Make America great again.”

When people use that phrase, what era are they referring to? Here & Now producer Chris Ballman asked Republican delegates that question outside the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

When you hear “make America great again,” what era comes to mind? Let us know with a comment below.

The 2016 Republican National Convention has come to a close, finishing up with a much-anticipated speech from GOP nominee Donald Trump.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Democratic political analyst Jamal Simmons and Republican strategist Paris Dennard about the reactions on both sides of the aisle.

Hear more of Here & Now‘s coverage from the Republican National Convention.

It’s been a big week for Cleveland with the Republican National Convention, but the city is used to royalty — rock royalty. The phrase “rock ‘n’ roll” is said to have originated here, from local DJ Alan Freed.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young went to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and spoke with visitors and Meredith Rutledge-Borger, the museum’s associate curator, about Cleveland’s music history.

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