Here & Now

  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Public radio's live midday news program offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

Keep abreast of what's happening Here & Now weekdays at 1 p.m. on 89.9 WSUF, 103.3 WQQQ, 1260 WSHU and 1340 WYBC.

Donald Trump is far behind Hillary Clinton among women voters.

In last night’s debate he had an opportunity to convince women to vote for him.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michelle Bernard, president and CEO of the Bernard Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy, about whether Trump was able to appeal to women.

Walk a few hundred yards into the woods in Durham, Connecticut these days and you’ll see something that looks like it’s out of “Mad Max.”

Large trucks with big wheels and giant robotic arms are grabbing trees and slicing them down.

But as Patrick Skahill from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports, this controlled chaos is a calculated timber harvest, with the long-term goal of creating a more resilient forest.

This month on NPR, we’ve been hearing from voters about identity and politics, as part of an election-year project called “A Nation Engaged.” We’re asking people “what it means to be an American” and “what can the next president do to further that vision?”

Today, we have answers to those questions from a Mexican American named Marisol Flores Aguirre from Tucson, Arizona, and Greg Locke, a preacher from Tennessee.

Tonight in Nevada presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will debate for the third and final time before the election on Nov. 8.

It will be the first debate since Trump announced that “the shackles have been taken off.” So it remains to be seen how he’ll respond to Clinton, who holds a clear lead in national and most battleground state polls.

Sibling Economics In A Recession

Oct 19, 2016

Economic mobility is critical to achieving the American dream, which centers on the hope that our children will be better off than we are.

To measure how the country is doing against that goal, experts typically look at how families do from one generation to the next. But what happens when there are class disparities among siblings?

Emiliano Villa from Here & Now contributor Youth Radio has the story.