Here & Now

  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Public radio's live, midday news program offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

Keep abreast of what's happening Here & Now weekdays on 89.9 WSUF, 103.3 WQQQ, WSHU-Fairfield County Public Radio and 1340 WYBC starting at 1 PM.

The United Kingdom votes Thursday on a proposal to leave the European Union. Last week, voters appeared to favor a Brexit for the first time since polling began on the referendum, but after the murder of MP Jo Cox, “Remain” is on top once again.

Nonetheless, economists are nervous that the move could have ripple effects for economic growth, trade and finance across Europe.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses the economic implications of Brexit with Marcel Fratzscher, president of The German Institute for Economic Research.

This week, presumed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump once again called for a temporary ban on Muslims and suggested President Obama was sympathetic to terrorists. Presumed Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton called Trump’s ideas nonsense, and called for a national assault weapons ban. Her rival Bernie Sanders, in a video message to supporters last night, didn’t concede the race and didn’t endorse Clinton.

Former Green Party candidate and consumer advocate Ralph Nader says the two-party American political system creates “second class citizens” out of third-party candidates.

He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the flaws he saw in the Democratic primary, and says those who still blame him for Al Gore’s presidential loss in 2000 are “fact deprived.”

Interview Highlights: Ralph Nader

On which candidate he’s supporting

Millions of dollars are pouring into various funds to help the families of the victims and the survivors of the Orlando attack. Attorney Kenneth Feinberg has been in charge of several similar funds after other tragedies, including 9/11, the Virginia Tech massacre and the Boston Marathon bombings.

He’s been consulting on how to handle the Orlando situation, and talks about the situation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

To Ellen Stofan, the chief scientist of NASA, all of the space agency’s various research initiatives from roving the craters of Mars to photographing the icy surface of Enceladus are in pursuit of one basic question: Are we alone?

Short of finding life on other planets, however, NASA scientists are advancing the fields of astrophysics, astronomy and planetary science every day. Stofan joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson for a look at scientific research at NASA.

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