Here & Now

  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Public radio's live, midday news program offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

Keep abreast of what's happening Here & Now weekdays on 89.9 WSUF, 103.3 WQQQ, WSHU-Fairfield County Public Radio and 1340 WYBC starting at 1 PM.

Seasonal Ingredients And How To Use Them

May 19, 2016

As local produce makes its way into stores and farmers markets, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst wants to know: What’s in season?  She brings us ingredients and recipes from Arizona, Illinois, Washington, and her home state of Maine.

See more recipes and cooking segments with Kathy Gunst

Charter schools throughout the country are increasingly competing with public schools for students. In Washington DC, nearly half of all students attend charter schools, some switching to them between grades. This can wreak havoc on the stability of enrollment from one grade to the next. Matthew Schwartz from Here & Now contributor WAMU visited Brent Elementary, a public school that has seen a steep decline in enrollment.

By the time alto-saxophonist, singer and composer Grace Kelly was 15, she’d performed with the Boston Pops and released several albums. Now 23, Kelly has released her tenth album: “Trying to Figure it Out,” she’s performed hundreds of concerts around the world, and she’s a regular member of Jon Batiste’s “Stay Human,” the house band for “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.”

Her music has also been featured on the Amazon TV series “Bosch,” on which Kelly made an appearance. Here & Now’s Robin Young catches up with Grace Kelly.

Apple CEO Tim Cook visited a Hindu temple in Mumbai before dawn Wednesday. Coming on the heels of a trip to China that resulted in a major investment in the Chinese company Didi Chuxing, Cook’s India itinerary is likely to include some significant business meetings.

The Oregon Trail Game’s Minnesota Roots

May 17, 2016

The Oregon Trail game has sold over 65 million copies worldwide and it is considered to be the most widely distributed educational game ever. But it was created in Minnesota by three aspiring teachers. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with one of them, Paul Dillenberger, about why he and his friends created the game and what its popularity has meant for them. He also stops by the end of the Oregon Trail in Oregon City and talks with school children on a field trip about the game.

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