Here & Now

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Public radio's live, midday news program offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

Keep abreast of what's happening Here & Now weekdays on 89.9 WSUF, 103.3 WQQQ, WSHU-Fairfield County Public Radio and 1340 WYBC starting at 1 PM.

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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Public Radio Super Bowl Bet: Denver Vs. Seattle

Public Radio hosts from the Broncos and Seahawks' hometowns -- Seattle's Andy Hurst and Denver's Jay Keller -- talk smack and place bets in anticipation of Super Bowl XLVIII. (Arturo Pardavila III/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 12:28 pm

The deluge of hype, buildup, beer and pizza ads will be over on Sunday, because either the Seattle Seahawks or the Denver Broncos will rise victorious out of the swamps of Jersey — raising high the trophy that goes to the winner of Super Bowl XLVIII. Back in the hometowns, the fans are gearing up.

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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

What Makes Tunisia Different?

Tunisia's new Prime minister Mehdi Jomaa (left) shakes hands with his predecessor Ali Laarayedh during a handover ceremony in Tunis on January 29, 2014. (Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

In a rare and historic development in the Arab world this week, an Islamist party stepped down as part of an orderly democratic transfer of power. It happened in Tunisia, the country that sparked the pro-democracy uprising three years ago that became the Arab Spring.

Tunisia has seen plenty of strife in the interim, including the assassination of two liberal political leaders. But while Tunisia’s neighbors, including Egypt and Libya, have slipped on the path to democracy, Tunisia just passed the most liberal constitution in the Arab world.

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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Google To Sell Motorola For $2.91 Billion

A guard stands in front of a newly opened Motorolla handphone shop in downtown Hanoi, Nov. 13, 2006. (Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images)

Google has agreed to sell Motorola to the Chinese technology giant Lenovo. This comes just two years after Google paid $12.5 billion to buy the company.

Google was counting that getting into the mobile cellphone business would pay off, but that didn’t happen. However, this isn’t a total financial loss for Google. The company is keeping billion of dollars’ worth of Motorola patents.

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NPR Story
4:38 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

DJ Sessions: Milwaukee's Paul Cebar

Paul Cebar is a musician and host of a weekly show on WMSE in Milwaukee. (Richard Dorbin)

In the latest installment of DJ Sessions, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson listens to some new music out of Milwaukee, from the sister-pair Vic and Gab to the Middle East-inspired Painted Caves and longtime singer-songwriter Paul Cebar, who is also our guide.

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NPR Story
4:38 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

New Safety Regulations For Bakken Shale Oil

Oil containers sit at a train depot on July 26, 2013 outside Williston, North Dakota. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Canadian and American regulatory bodies are taking steps to change the way crude oil from the Bakken shale formation in North Dakota is transported by train.

While most crude oil is not very flammable, oil from the Bakken Shale has been involved in two huge explosions during train accidents, one of which claimed 47 lives.

The new safety regulations call for strengthening the train cars in which Bakken crude is moved, and planning new routes for those trains that would minimize exposure to populated areas.

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