Ana Espinola/The Eye at Columbia University


Haris Durrani is a Dominican-Pakistani Muslim from Westport, Connecticut. Durrani co-founded the Muslim Protagonist Symposium at Columbia University to showcase stories by Muslims in a post-9/11 world. At his parents home in Westport, Durrani told WSHU's Cassandra Basler about his event and the Muslim protagonist of his debut book, Technologies of the Self.

Meredith Miller / Beinecke Digital Studio

The Windham Campbell Literary Prizes Festival wrapped up at Yale University last week. Nine prizewinners from around the globe in drama, non-fiction, and fiction were surprised with the prestigious awards that grant them $150,000 each.

Courtesy Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The Windham-Campbell literary festival is going on in New Haven this week. Eight writers from around the globe are being honored, having been surprised with prestigious awards that grant them $150,000 each. Here are the voices of a few of them—John Vaillant, Aminatta Forna, and Nadeem Aslam—speaking about their prizewinning work:

Kate Uhry

All of us may love when a feeling of inspiration infuses our work. Best-selling novelist and memoirist Dani Shapiro looks back on 20 years of facing the blank page—and teaching others about her craft—and says she's learned that for us all it's really about showing up, and following a trail of "breadcrumbs through a forest," as it were.

WSHU's Mark Herz talks to Shapiro about her latest book, Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of a Creative Life.

©2010 David Ignaszewski / Koboy

The giant online marketer Amazon and the international publisher Hachette  are fighting over the book business. But writers—the people who make books, may not get much of that fight.