Business

Gun rights advocate says bans make us less safe
4:34 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Murphy & Blumenthal call on retail stores to ban guns

Connecticut’s two U.S. Senators are asking retail stores to ban people from carrying guns into their stores.  A gun rights advocate says those policies would make people less safe.

U.S. Senators Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal made the call following the release of an FBI report last week on 160 active shooter incidents from 2000 to 2013 that killed more than a thousand victims.

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Agriculture
5:00 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Apple crop is down in Conn.

A photo taken at Sun High Orchards in Randolph, New Jersey on Sept. 27, 2014.
Credit flickr member Shinya Suzuki

Visitors to Connecticut’s fruit farms looking to pick apples this fall will see a smaller crop and fewer varieties. Growers blame last year’s severe winter weather for the shortfall. 

Apple pickers looking for the best bushel or peck of Honeycrisp, Macoun, and other apples will have to be less choosy this year.

That's because some growers in the state are experiencing significantly smaller crops.

Mike Bozzi is a manager at Ellsworth Hill Orchard and Berry Farm in Sharon. He says his apple crop is down at least 40 percent. 

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"This will reverberate through the banking world"
7:12 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

N.Y. jury finds Arab Bank liable for funding terrorism

Attorneys for Arab Bank leave Federal Court in Brooklyn. Shand Stephens, center.
Credit AP Photo/Richard Drew

In a verdict that has far-reaching consequences for global banking, a federal jury in New York has found Arab Bank liable for funding terrorism in Israel between 2000 and 2004.

300 American victims and their families sued the Jordan-based bank, saying they violated the Anti-Terrorism Act by knowingly funding Hamas during the second Intifada. The plaintiffs convinced a jury that the bank gave material support in 24 attacks where Americans were hurt or killed.

This is the first time the Anti-Terrorism Act has been used civilly against a bank.

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"regulators are too slow to catch them"
9:47 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

SEC penalizes first high-frequency trader

May 7, 2010, file photo. Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange the day after the "Flash Crash" and The Dow Jones industrials dropped 1,000 points. The crash brought scrutiny to high-frequency trading and other computerized strategies that move buy and sell orders at blinding speeds.
Credit AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) charged a New York trading firm with the largest fine ever for breaking rules designed to keep risky trades from unraveling the financial system.

It is also the first time the SEC penalized a high-frequency trader.

High-frequency traders, or flash traders, make millions of trades a minute. They are the focus of an ongoing debate over whether those trades make the market function better or exploit slower, traditional traders.

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Cracking down on lenders and debt agencies
5:55 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

New York moves to protect troubled borrowers

Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman proposes reforms to consumer debt cases in state courts with new filing requirements for collectors of so-called "zombie" debts.
Credit AP Photo

In separate actions, New York officials are cracking down on companies taking advantage of troubled borrowers. 

The Department of Financial Services issued subpoenas to nine lending companies in the state Tuesday. The state's bank regulator is investigating them for what are called "loan-to-own" schemes.

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