dredging

Steven Senne / AP

In Connecticut, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers will soon dredge New Haven Harbor to make way for ships.

The Corps told New Haven residents this week that it’s still not sure what to do with up to 5 million cubic yards of sand, silt, rock and potential pollution that it will dig up.

Louis Burch, the Connecticut director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment, says residents don’t want to see the same old solution.

Courtesy of Pixabay

The Suffolk County Legislature approved a resolution to join a lawsuit with New York State against the Environmental Protection Agency’s plan to dump dredging materials from Connecticut into the Long Island Sound.

AP Photo/Frank Eltman

New York state has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency opposing a plan to allow dredged sediments to be dumped into the Long Island Sound.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has threatened for more than a year to take the action announced Thursday. He and fellow Democrat Attorney General Eric Schneiderman say the EPA plan will allow tens of millions of cubic yards of dredged sediments to be dumped in the waterway that divides Long Island and Connecticut.

Emily Dooley / AP

The Asharoken Village Board on Long Island’s North Shore has rejected a proposed federal plan to restore a heavily eroded strip of beach that connects some residents to the mainland.

Frank Eltman / AP

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says the state will sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over its final decision to allow a new site to dump dredged materials in Long Island Sound.

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