environment

EPA Approves Dredging Plan, Angering Environmentalists

Apr 29, 2016
Steve Resler

On Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved a 30-year-plan for the continued dumping of dredge material in the Long Island Sound. The Army Corps of Engineers dredges silt and sand from rivers and ports to keep them navigable.

U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) supports the plan. He says dredging is important to Connecticut’s economy. 

Karen DeWitt / WSHU

Fracktivists, as anti-fracking activists are called, hope to play a role in New York’s presidential primary. Activists are asking Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, as well as Republican candidates, to take a stand against the Constitution Pipeline and other natural gas pipelines, that if approved could crisscross the state. 

Kevin P. Coughlin/Office of the Governor

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he’ll increase funding to environmental projects as well as state parks, in his 2016 budget. The news was applauded by environmentalists, as well as some business leaders.

Governor Cuomo is releasing parts of his 2016 agenda in the days leading up to his speech. In a speech on Long Island, he said that he’ll increase the state’s Environmental Protection Fund, which languished during the long recession and slow economic recovery.

(AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

The railroad line that runs through Connecticut is 115 miles long, hugging the shoreline from New York to Rhode Island. Trains have traveled this corridor since the 1800's but now climate change could be threatening their future. The coast has been battered by several recent storms, including Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy, effecting low lying sections of the rail system. Some say rising sea levels will cause repeated flooding of those and other areas.

Greg Bilionis / SoundWaters

Over the winter, the SoundWaters nature education center in Stamford got an unexpected donation: 22 baby diamondback terrapins rescued from an international turtle-smuggling ring.

SoundWaters director Leigh Shemitz says the baby turtles came by overnight mail from Anchorage, Alaska. That’s where U.S. customs officials found more than 200 of them, in her words, “Stuffed into buckets and boxes and boots on their way to China.”

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