immigration

Melinda Tuhus

Protesters took over a major intersection in Hartford during rush hour on Monday to demonstrate their outrage over last week's Supreme Court tie vote that stalled DAPA, one of President Obama's signature immigration programs. 

Mike Groll / AP

New York State has removed a barrier that's kept immigrants who entered the country illegally as children from teaching or practicing medicine in the state.

Mike Groll / AP

During her sophomore year at Southern Connecticut State University, Cinthia Perez and her younger brother dropped out. They decided to work full-time because the family was struggling to pay tuition out-of-pocket.  

Perez said, “It was really hard for my mom, especially. She was like, ‘No, I want you guys to go to college because that would be the main key to help everyone in the family.’ But then we were like, ‘It was either that, or we’re just not going to have any food at home.’”

Two Towns, 3,000 Miles, One History

Apr 7, 2016
Will James

Trancito Perez was working in a New Jersey factory in 1975 when he asked a friend where he might find a job on a farm.

Perez had spent his childhood growing corn and beans with his father in his hometown of San Raymundo, Guatemala. After a year crisscrossing the United States, he longed to work in the open air.

“Long Island,” the friend said. So Perez went, settling in the Riverhead area on Long Island’s North Fork.

The Iran-Iraq War had a profound impact on Pari Forood and her family. In 1984 the conflict between the two nations had been raging for four years. According to some reports, by that time a total of about 450,000 soldiers from both countries had been killed or wounded. And that was the year Pari’s 17-year-old cousin, Sahand, was drafted into the Iranian army.

Meanwhile Pari was working in Washington, D.C. as the press secretary for Congressman Hamilton Fish of New York. Pari was born in the United States. Her father is Iranian. Her mother is from Pennsylvania.

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