Judiciary

State of Connecticut Judicial Branch

Richard Robinson, the first African-American chief justice of Connecticut, is to be sworn in Monday at a ceremony at the state Supreme Court in Hartford.

Robinson, a 60-year-old Stamford native who now lives in Stratford, is to be sworn in by Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy. The Governor has known Robinson since the 1980s when Robinson was staff counsel for the City of Stamford and Malloy was on the city finance board.

State of Connecticut Judicial Branch

Richard Robinson has become the first African-American chief justice of Connecticut. The 60-year-old associate justice of the State Supreme Court was unanimously confirmed by the State Senate, 36-0, on Thursday. He was confirmed by the House on Monday.

Robinson, a Stratford resident, who has served on the Connecticut bench for the past 18 years, received praise from both sides of the aisle. State Senate Republican President Len Fasano says he was impressed by Robinson’s judicial philosophy that the courts should treat everyone fairly.

Jessica Hill / AP

The Republican President of the Connecticut Senate broke with the majority of his caucus on Tuesday and voted with Democrats to approve several of Governor Dannel Malloy’s new Superior Court judge nominees.

State of Connecticut Judicial Branch

The first African-American nominated to be chief justice of Connecticut won the unanimous approval of the State House of Representatives on Monday.  

The 146 to 0 vote in support of Associate Justice Richard Robinson came as no surprise. Democrats and Republicans praised Robinson.

Courtesy of Pixabay

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy's last batch of 30 superior court judge nominees won approval in the state General Assembly’s Judiciary Committee on Monday. But some lawmaker’s say confirmation of the judges by the full House and Senate might depend on whether they can find the money to pay the judges.

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