Long Island Sound

EPA Approves Dredging Plan, Angering Environmentalists

Apr 29, 2016
Steve Resler

On Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved a 30-year-plan for the continued dumping of dredge material in the Long Island Sound. The Army Corps of Engineers dredges silt and sand from rivers and ports to keep them navigable.

U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) supports the plan. He says dredging is important to Connecticut’s economy. 

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Environmentalists are calling on the EPA to make changes to a 30-year dredging plan for Long Island Sound.

The plan was released in January by the Army of Corps of Engineers, and it requires approval from the EPA.

It calls for continued dumping of dredged materials into areas of the Sound. Those materials, like silt and sand, are dredged by the Corps from waterways — mainly in Connecticut — to keep them navigable.

AP Photo/Mike Balsamo

Suffolk County Police have rescued three men and the search continues for a fourth man after a small plane crashed into Long Island Sound on Saturday night.

A student pilot was flying the plane when it began to experience engine trouble. His instructor took over and attempted an emergency landing into Setauket Harbor. Suffolk Police Commissioner Timothy Sini said it was officers’ bold actions that saved 3 lives.

Sgt. Paul Mercready was one of several officers that took kayaks from Port Jefferson residents to reach the victims.

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Connecticut’s congressional delegation has endorsed a 30-year U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan for dredging around Long Island Sound. Some lawmakers in New York are opposed to that plan.

Connecticut's environmental commissioner, Rob Klee, has endorsed a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to continue dumping dredged materials into areas of Long Island Sound. Those materials, like silt, are dredged by the corps from Connecticut waterways to keep them navigable.

Along with dumping some of the dredged materials into the Sound, the 30-year draft plan also suggests other ways to get rid of it, like recycling the dredged materials, and using it to fortify beaches, or restore marshes.

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