science

Reid Wiseman / NASA

Last spring scientists discovered three new Earth-sized planets outside of our solar system, raising the question: could intelligent live exist elsewhere?

Some try to answer this question with the Drake Equation, an estimation equation named after astrophysicist Frank Drake, who developed it in 1961.

Courtesy of NASA

More than 90 percent of all the stuff in the universe is made up of a mysterious substance called dark matter. Dark matter holds together galaxies like glue, but we don’t know what it is.

Davis Dunavin / WSHU

Any journalist will tell you that it can be difficult for scientists to explain themselves in layman’s terms.

Actor Alan Alda and Stony Brook University are trying to change that. Since 2009, the university has offered improv classes for scientists out of its Alan Alda Center for Scientific Communication. Alda got the idea while he was the host of the PBS show Scientific American Frontiers in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Davis Dunavin / WSHU

An expanding community college program in Connecticut is promising lots of jobs to students in the field of advanced manufacturing: a range of work that requires that requires the latest and most advanced technology and more precision than traditional manufacturing. Government officials and businesses see it as a second chance to for the state be a nationwide manufacturing player – and some students are betting it’ll give them a second chance, too.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

How would you explain sleep to an 11-year-old? That's the question scientists around the world will attempt to answer for a competition that's to be judged at Stony Brook University this spring. It's called The Flame Challenge. It's an annual competition organized by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science.

Actor Alan Alda is the inspiration behind the challenge. He says the idea came out of his own life.

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