Science

Climate science
6:37 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Study suggests storm directions like Superstorm Sandy may become more rare

Superstorm Sandy approaches the coast
Credit Flickr/Sharla Sava

A new study suggests climate change may make a hurricane landfall like last year's Superstorm Sandy less likely. But the researchers say that’s no reason to become complacent about storm preparation.

Climate Change
9:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Conn., NY, looking at signs of climate change in Long Island Sound

With climate change, the saltmarsh sparrow could be an endangered species.
Credit Mark Szantyr

A new joint effort by Connecticut and New York is aimed at identifying the signals, or sentinels, of climate change in and around Long Island Sound. The goal is to help the coastal areas of both states prepare for the effects of a changing climate. But as the CT Mirror's Jan Ellen Spiegel reports, for one key sentinel, time may already be running out.

Visit CT mirror for more photos

Environment
8:42 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Conn. environmental officials battling invasive reeds in salt marshes

DEEP workers on the Marsh Master, a vehicle used to navigate through tall, dense phragmites reeds.
Xander Landen

Salt marshes throughout Connecticut are a battleground with native species facing foreign invaders. Right now, one of those invaders is winning the battle. State environmental officials are fighting off an invasive reed, called Phragmites that hurts the health and diversity of marshes.


Superstorm Sandy Recovery
8:37 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Conn. shoreline may not be ready for another storm hit

Great Creek in Milford was 8 feet wide here, after Irene and Sandy it grew to 35 feet wide
Credit Jan Ellen Spiegel

The National Hurricane Center has predicted an active to extremely active Atlantic storm season that includes 3 to 6 major hurricanes. Not what Connecticut's shoreline communities wanted to hear as they continue to rebuild from the damage in tropical storm Irene and storm Sandy. For wrecked roads, pumping stations and other infrastructure the question is when they will be repaired. But for the battered shoreline itself, the question is often whether to repair it at all.


Read more
Science
11:32 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Summer cicada invasion not as dramatic as expected

Adult Cicada
Credit Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

Habitat loss since 1996 made it difficult for some of Connecticut's seventeen year cicadas to come out of the ground this summer. Cicadas emerged closer to the central part of the state in wooded areas, where food was more available.

Pages