AP Photo/Seth Perlman

In the wake of terrorist attacks in Paris that left 129 people dead this month, U.S. Senators Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, along with Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer of New York, are trying to pass a bill that they say would prevent suspected terrorists in America from buying guns.

(AP Photo/Bilal Hussein, File)

It’s been a week since terrorist attacked the cities of Beirut and Paris. ISIS has claimed responsibility for both attacks. News coverage of both these attacks has not been the same.

"The media failed to recognize and respect what happened in Lebanon," said Peter Atallah, President of the Lebanese Student Association at UConn. Atallah wants to raise awareness on campus about the attacks in Beirut.

Chris Snyder

A French bakery in Fairfield, Connecticut has seen an outpouring of support since the terrorist attacks in Paris last week.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

In a verdict that has far-reaching consequences for global banking, a federal jury in New York has found Arab Bank liable for funding terrorism in Israel between 2000 and 2004.

300 American victims and their families sued the Jordan-based bank, saying they violated the Anti-Terrorism Act by knowingly funding Hamas during the second Intifada. The plaintiffs convinced a jury that the bank gave material support in 24 attacks where Americans were hurt or killed.

This is the first time the Anti-Terrorism Act has been used civilly against a bank.

Charles Lane

Long Island Congressman Peter King attended Friday prayers at a mosque in Bay Shore Friday. King notoriously held five congressional hearings on what he considered the proliferation of radical Islam following September 11th. King was invited by the mosque’s president, and he used the visit to explain his comments which many see as disparaging to Muslims.