Music Respawn with Kate Remington

WSHU Public Radio’s Kate Remington combines her love of classical music and video games in this series of informal conversations with composers and performers of game soundtracks. Plus, there’s lots of music in the interviews, so you can hear it for yourself!

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The Videri String Quartet is a group of young Boston-based, conservatory-trained musicians who use their powers to perform imaginative arrangements of music for games. I talked with the members of the quartet, violinists Lizzie Jones and Michael Hustedde; violist and founder, Rosalie Samter; and cellist Jeremiah Barcus. 

An emotional playthrough of Journey inspired members of Chicago's Fifth House Ensemble to create a live version. I talked with Melissa and Eric Snoza about how they created this unique concert experience.

The two Homeworld games, released in 1999 and 2003, told the story of an epic journey of a displaced tribe to find a new home planet. Guided by an ancient map, they bravely made their way across the vast reaches of the galaxy, enduring hardships and battles along the way.

There are some composers whose music instantly transports you to a particular place and time. Aaron Copland had a gift for capturing the American West in his music, and Vaughan Williams was able to recreate the English countryside. In her soundtrack for "Dear Esther,"  BAFTA award winning composer Jessica Curry takes us to a bleak island in the Hebrides and in "Everybody's Gone to the Rapture," she creates nostalgia in an abandoned village in 1980s Shropshire.

Where are new fans of classical music going to come from? That’s a common question among symphony orchestras, and just about every performer.

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