Vintage Radio

Late 1920s Atwater Kent Littlestove radio
Late 1920s Atwater Kent Littlestove radio
Credit Paul Litwinovich

In this occasional series, WSHU Chief Engineer Paul Litwinovich explores aspects of vintage radio. The subjects will range from the radio sets themselves to the people and technology that made it all possible. He'll talk about collecting, dating, and restoring these relics of yesteryear. Each article features a different vintage set with information about its place in the development of the electronic age. Some of the sets featured are from his own collection. 

Comments and questions are welcome at paull@wshu.org

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Vintage Radio
12:14 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Radio Prepares for War, Part 1

1935 National HRO U.S. Navy Receiver.
Credit P. Litwinovich collection

As the roaring twenties came to a close, radio technology would continue to evolve with significant improvements to consumer sets, particularly in the area of shortwave reception. Read my past articles for more details as to how this transpired. The price of radios would continue to fall as availability continued to increase. Herbert Hoover could have added "a radio in every home" to his famous "a chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" campaign slogan. This radio boom would continue right up until December of 1941, when the first bombs were dropped on Pearl Harbor.

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Vintage Radio
11:21 am
Thu August 14, 2014

Breaking News, 1937: Hindenburg burns

German airship Hindenburg burning at Lakehurst Naval Station, NJ, May 6, 1937
Credit Library of Congress, collection contributed by Murray Becker

The Hindenburg disaster was not the first time that radio influenced the way or the speed by which news was delivered to the masses, nor was it the first major event  to be given live coverage. To look at radio’s influence on news delivery of breaking events, we need to go back to the Titanic disaster.  Although the Titanic’s  plea for help was monitored only by other ships, a small handful of commercial shore stations, and perhaps a few early amateur operators, it did mark a turning point in media communications. Newspapers featured the story on their front pages and in special editions the following morning. Were it not for wireless communications, the story probably would not have reached the newspapers for several days. Other events marked the coverage of news live as it happened. KDKA, the nation’s first licensed broadcaster, went on the air with the coverage of the Harding/ Cox presidential election in 1920.

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Vintage Radio
1:53 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

A Radio for the Great Depression, Part II

1931 Philco Model 70 in a cathedral cabinet
Credit P. Litwinovich collection

Last month we looked at radio at the start of the Great Depression and how RCA’s President David Sarnoff made the decision to license the heterodyne circuit to any manufacturer willing to pay royalties to use it. The heterodyne circuit, combined with the new developments in vacuum tube technology, allowed manufacturers to build affordable radios that performed far better than most of the high end sets from just a few years prior.

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Vintage Radio
1:47 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A Radio for the Great Depression

Edwin Armstrong as a major in WWI

Last month we looked at the RCA Radiola 46, a lavish high end radio that went into production in the spring of 1929, about 6 months before the October market crash that began the Great Depression. This month will be the first half of a two part article in which we will look at how radio faired in those difficult times and how RCA in particular changed its business philosophy to survive.

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Vintage Radio
1:23 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

A Radio for the Roaring Twenties

1929 RCA Radiola 46
Credit P. Litwinovich collection

Last month we looked at radio cabinetry. This month we take a look at one of its examples, a 1929 RCA Radiola 46 in a high boy console. David Sarnoff (*1), a Belarusian born immigrant, led the Radio Corporation of America for an incredible span of 51 years, from 1919 until his retirement in 1970. He passed away a year later at age 80. By 1929 RCA, under Sarnoff's leadership, had established itself as a giant of the radio industry. It’s chief (and at this time larger) competitor was the Atwater Kent company, named after its owner. (*2), Atwater Kent was a privately held corporation whose radio factory covered more than 15 acres. I’ll spend more time on Atwater Kent and his company in the future.

The RCA Model 46 was a prime example of where radio was prior to the market crash of 1929 and the great depression that followed. This radio was grand, it was a reflection of the times. It represents a high end set that featured new technology and an elaborate cabinet. It sold for $179 (*3) which is the equivalent of $2,430 in 2014 dollars. (*4). For the upper class, primarily business owners and those invested in the stock market, it was a time of affluence. The average per capita income nationally however was $750 per year, with that of rural and farm income being  $273 per year  (*5), so this radio would have been out of reach for most. It should be noted though, that when compared to high end sets made between 1925 and 1929, that the average selling price of radios was dropping. As with almost all technology, this was due to higher volumes, and better manufacturing techniques. The upcoming economic depression would force this trend to a whole new level.

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