Shimon Peres, The Last Of Israel's Founding Leaders, Dies At 93

The last surviving leader of Israel's founding generation, Shimon Peres was a three-time prime minister, the architect of the country's secretive nuclear program and a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to make peace with the Palestinians.Peres, who died Tuesday at 93 according to Israeli officials, was at the center of recurring Middle East dramas throughout his more than six decades of public life....
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Mike Groll / AP

Are Cuomo’s Steps To Address Alleged Bid Rigging Enough?

Governor Cuomo is making some changes to prevent any future bid rigging in some of his major economic development projects, but critics on both the left and the right say the governor is failing to address the bigger picture – whether the $8.6 billion dollars’ worth of programs are an effective use of public monies.
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Flight MH17 Was Shot Down By Missile Moved From Russia, Investigators Say

A Dutch-led team of international investigators has concluded that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, which crashed in July 2014, was shot down by a Russian Buk missile that had been transferred into rebel-held eastern Ukraine.After the shooting, the surface-to-air missile launcher was transferred back to Russia.The crash of MH17 killed all 298 people aboard. The preliminary results of the international criminal...
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The Senate will vote Wednesday on whether to override one of President Obama's veto for the first time in his presidency.

The Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA) would give families of Sept. 11 victims the right to sue Saudi Arabia for aiding or financing the terrorism attacks. The House is likely to take up the same vote by the end of this week.

The U.S. government has agreed to pay a total of $492 million to 17 American Indian tribes for mismanaging natural resources and other tribal assets, according to an attorney who filed most of the suits.

Few things inspire more loathing in the hearts of high school students than the words "extra homework." But as Florence Mattei hands out a pamphlet to her homeroom class at the Southlands School in Rome, she tells them they may want to give this assignment a chance.

"Who would like to read what it's about?" she asks the room full of 18-year-olds.

A senior named Alessio translates from Italian into English: "For the people born in 1998 there is a 500-euro bonus that you can spend on cultural things, such as going to the cinema, visiting museums and this kind of stuff."

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton said some things that were flat out untrue — or misleading — in the first presidential debate Monday night. (Check out NPR's comprehensive fact check here.)

Courtesy of Pixabay

Although cases of murder and manslaughter rose by more than 30 percent in Connecticut last year, the state experienced an overall decrease in violent crime.

Billionaire tech entrepreneur Elon Musk says his space transport company, SpaceX, will build a rocket system capable of bringing people to Mars and supporting a permanent city on the red planet.

"It's something we can do in our lifetimes," he said in a speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico that was streamed online and watched by more than 100,000 people. "You could go."

Scenes From Outside The Presidential Debate

22 hours ago
Joe Ryder / WSHU

About 1,500 people showed up to demonstrate at the first presidential debate Monday night at Hofstra University on Long Island.

Scott Morgan / AP

Supporters of Libertarian Candidate Gary Johnson and Green Party Candidate Jill Stein say they will continue to protest their exclusion from the presidential debates.

Frank Franklin II / AP

Union members gathered outside the first presidential debate at Hofstra University on Long Island Monday night to demand help for the working and middle class.

Bertha Vazquez has taught earth science for more than 25 years.

"For many years I covered the basic standard, probably like most people in the country do," she says.

Then one day, she says, she decided to throw that all out the window after seeing former Vice President Al Gore speak at the University of Miami at a screening of An Inconvenient Truth, his documentary about climate change.

"And it really ... hit me. This is 2007 and, I've got to tell you, I lost sleep," Vazquez says.

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