Pat Eaton-Robb / AP

For Every High Profile Immigration Stay, Dozens Leave New England

In July 2017, Iglesias de Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven swarmed with national press, protesters, Connecticut’s U.S. Senators and Governor Dannel Malloy.

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Courtesy of Pixabay

Connecticut Businesses Struggle To Find Workers

Connecticut companies are looking for new workers, but not finding them. That’s the result of a survey by the Connecticut Business and Industry Association (CBIA). According to CBIA economist Peter Gioa, part of the problem is a mismatch between what employers need and what Connecticut workers have to offer.

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It's A Beautiful 50th Birthday For 'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9uIJ-o2yqQ Fifty years ago Monday, when Fred Rogers showed up on national public television as the host of what then was a brand new children's show called Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, TV was a lot different. PBS wasn't even a network then — not by that name, anyway — and aside from CBS, NBC and ABC, there were only a few independent local channels to watch, if that. But 50 years ago, young kids were pretty much the same. I interviewed Fred Rogers a few times...

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Dave Collins / AP

Seven African-American and Hispanic families filed a civil rights lawsuit against Connecticut and Hartford officials on Thursday. The families are challenging race-based student quotas at the city's magnet schools, saying hundreds of seats in the schools are unfilled because of a complicated formula imposed on the city,  following the landmark school desegregation case Sheff v. O’Neill.  

The Stamford Symphony Orchestra has narrowed its search for a new music director and conductor to a few outstanding artists.

Food scientists at the University of Massachussetts Amherst have come up with a technique they say could make it a lot easier to avoid food poisoning.

The main piece of equipment? Your smartphone.

Currently, to identify the bacteria that can get you sick, like E. coli or salmonella, food scientists often use DNA testing.

They obtain samples from, say, raw spinach or chicken skin, by rinsing the food and collecting a tiny bit of bacteria from the water. Then they let that bacteria multiply over 24 hours to get a big enough sample.

The city of Raqqa was the de facto capital of the Islamic State. ISIS fighters were defeated there back in October, and they scattered in all directions. But they left behind a deadly legacy - thousands upon thousands of explosive booby traps.

Now U.S. and Syrian trainers are teaching young men how to dismantle those bombs, at a village on the outskirts of the city.

Updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

President Trump is facing calls to act in the wake of the latest mass shooting, which killed 17 people Wednesday at a high school in Florida, and the White House is not ignoring them. The president will participate in a pair of listening sessions on school safety this week, and on Monday morning the White House said he supports efforts to improve the federal background check system, something Congress has expressed broad support for without acting on after past shootings.

Oxfam International says three members of a team it deployed to Haiti in 2010 who were investigated for sexual exploitation there threatened a key witness in the inquiry.

The U.K.-based aid group has come under intense scrutiny in recent weeks after The Times of London reported that some of its staff working in the Caribbean country after a devastating earthquake had hired local prostitutes. Oxfam's senior official in Haiti at the time was among those implicated.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. women's ice hockey team dismantled Finland in their semifinals matchup at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Monday, scoring goals early and often and claiming a spot in the gold medal game, where they will face Canada.

The U.S. team scored two goals in each of the first two periods; a pair of scores came in less than one minute in the second period.

Here's a serious pop culture conundrum. Why are we still so obsessed with zombies?

Maybe you've seen the movies World War Z and 28 Days Later and the TV series iZombie and Santa Clarita Diet. Or maybe you've read Zone One by Pulitzer-winning author Colson Whitehead or Pride And Prejudice And Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith. Haven't you had enough of zombies over the last decade?

There's a big, glittering musical in a classic key on Broadway again, where the townspeople of Yonkers sing and dance, the New York Central train toots steam and the audience starts standing in ovation from the moment the big-name star takes the stage.

A woman who had an alleged nine-month sexual relationship with Donald Trump more than a decade ago, is speaking on the record for the first time about signing a document from an apparent Trump media ally that effectively silenced her story.

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