Douglas Healey / AP

Suffolk County Suing Drug Companies Over Opioids

Suffolk County is suing Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma along with a number of other pharmaceutical companies for deceptive practices that it claims led to the county’s opioid and heroin epidemic.
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5 Things To Know About Obama's Enforcement Of Immigration Laws

In a speech Wednesday night, Trump will lay out — and clarify — his proposed immigration policy.His stance on immigration has appeared to change more in the last 10 days than it has in the last 10 months.But perhaps the most unexpected element of the recent shifts in rhetoric is that Trump has praised President Obama's work on immigration enforcement, a...
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Jon Kassel

Hampton Classic Horse Show Is On!

Horses and riders from around the world have made their way to the East End of Long Island to compete in the annual Hampton Classic Horse Show, one of the largest jumping competitions in the country. Opening day was Sunday.
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Be.Futureproof / Flickr

A Nassau County doctor has pleaded not guilty to federal charges of illegally distributing oxycodone to patients over a three-year period during which time two died from overdoses.

An experimental drug dramatically reduced the toxic plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, a team reports in the journal Nature.

Results from a small number of patients who received a high dose of the drug, called aducanumab, hint that it may also be able to slow the loss of memory and thinking.

Scientists Discover Earth-Like Planet

10 hours ago
AP / European Southern Observatory

If the Milky Way galaxy were the size of the continental United States, Proxima Centauri, our nearest neighboring star, would be about one-tenth of a mile away.

The first commercial flight from the U.S. to Cuba in more than half a century landed in the Cuban city of Santa Clara, marking another milestone in the thawing relationship between the two countries.

The inaugural trip was a JetBlue flight from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., that took off Wednesday morning bound for Abel Santamaria International Airport in central Cuba. And as NPR's Scott Horsley tells our Newscast unit, two Cuban-American pilots were at the controls.

Chicago's police superintendent is moving to fire five officers who were involved in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old LaQuan McDonald in 2014 — one who pulled the trigger, and four who are accused of giving false statements about what happened.

McDonald, who was black, was shot 16 times by officer Jason Van Dyke. Other officers said that McDonald had lunged at police before he was shot. But dashcam footage of the incident — released under a court order — contradicted their testimony.

Three big political players were facing stiff competition and angry bases.

And all three brushed those opponents aside with relative ease Tuesday night.

Arizona's John McCain, Florida's Marco Rubio and embattled former Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz all won their parties' nominations to be elected for another term in Congress.

That despite millions of dollars spent against their candidacies by upstarts, some deep pocketed, fueled by anger at politics as usual. But that seemed to fizzle when the votes came in.

Hours before he is slated to make a major policy speech on immigration Wednesday in Phoenix, Donald Trump is making a bold move — he will be meeting with Mexico's president.

He tweeted the news late Tuesday night:

"I have accepted the invitation of President Enrique Peña Nieto, of Mexico, and look very much forward to meeting him tomorrow."

Part One in an NPR Ed series on mental health in schools.

You might call it a silent epidemic.

Up to one in five kids living in the U.S. shows signs or symptoms of a mental health disorder in a given year.

So in a school classroom of 25 students, five of them may be struggling with the same issues many adults deal with: depression, anxiety, substance abuse.

Hundreds of Catholics have been declared saints in recent decades, but few with the acclaim accorded Mother Teresa, set to be canonized by Pope Francis on Sunday, largely in recognition of her service to the poor in India.

"When I was coming of age, she was the living saint," says the Most Rev. Robert Barron, the auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. "If you were saying, 'Who is someone today that would really embody the Christian life?' you would turn to Mother Teresa of Calcutta."

The extended drought in California has farmers looking for ways to use less water. Among them: growing feed indoors using hydroponics. The new diet is making some Central Valley sheep very happy.

On Golden Valley Farm an hour north of Fresno, Mario Daccarett's employees milk 500 sheep every day, in rounds of 12. This creamy milk eventually is turned into cheese and sold at places like Whole Foods.

"They tell me that our Golden Ewe cheese is the best for grilled cheese sandwich ever," Daccarett says. (I bought some and it was really tasty.)

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