In Major Blow To Trump, GOP Health Care Bill Vote Delayed

The long-promised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, has been delayed, NPR's Susan Davis reports. It was supposed to get a vote Thursday night, but it has been running into trouble — from both the right and the center. Thursday afternoon, the votes were not there to pass the bill. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy tried downplay the task ahead, saying on CNN that leadership just needs to convince "a couple more" lawmakers to give their...

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Police Identify Suspect In London Attack Near Parliament; Death Toll Rises To 4

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET The man who is believed to have carried out a deadly attack near the U.K. Parliament has been identified by Britain's Metropolitan Police as Khalid Masood, 52. Police believe the man acted alone. He was shot and killed after carrying out an attack that killed a police officer and three civilians and wounded several others around 2:40 p.m. local time Wednesday. (Two of the civilian victims died on Wednesday; the third was hospitalized after the attack and died Thursday....

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Mike Groll / AP

Gov. Cuomo Threatens To Sue Federal Government Over Healthcare Changes

Governor Cuomo says he’s considering suing the federal government over an amendment to the health care act proposed by two New York congressman, saying it may violate state sovereignty.

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LIRR Customer Satisfaction Up In Latest Survey

Mar 22, 2017
Adam Moss / Flickr

The latest survey of the Long Island Rail Road showed a slight rise in customer satisfaction.

Lawsuit Brought In Suffolk Airport Chemical Case

Mar 22, 2017
Courtesy of Pixabay

About 200 Long Island residents plan to sue Suffolk County and the State of New York for allegedly exposing them to hazardous chemicals from an air base in Westhampton Beach.

Two men who were born in Germany but don't have German citizenship will be deported to countries in North Africa, where their parents immigrated from, over suspicions that they were planning a terrorist attack. German officials say it's the first time the government is making such a move.

In a hearing that stretched through nearly 12 hours Tuesday, the Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch took a long step toward Senate confirmation.

Barring an utterly unforeseen reversal when the questioning resumes Wednesday, observers expect Judiciary Committee approval along party lines on April 3 and a similar win on the Senate floor.

Twenty senators took turns asking questions for half an hour each. The Republicans tried to get the country to share their affinity for the nominee. The Democrats tried to tie him to President Trump.

There's a wall-long mural in the manufacturing area of SilencerCo, in West Valley City, Utah, that shows a crowd of people with muzzled mouths. One's holding a sign that says, "Fight the Noise." Another says: "Guns don't have to be loud."

As a leading manufacturer and seller of gun silencers — or suppressors, as they're more accurately called — SilencerCo wants to quiet guns. Congress may soon help in the effort.

The six-episode podcast Missing Richard Simmons dropped its final episode on Monday, two days ahead of schedule. For a project nominally devoted to finding out more about what happened to onetime fitness guru Richard Simmons, it wasn't very satisfying by that standard. Host Dan Taberski concluded, in effect, that Richard Simmons was safe and physically healthy and had withdrawn voluntarily from public life without much fanfare, which is ... pretty much what we already knew. That's what Simmons had said in a call to Today that Taberski played again and again.

After a day of statements, Tuesday's Supreme Court confirmation hearing was all about answers. Judge Neil Gorsuch was careful in his responses to Senate Judiciary Committee members, but there were still a number of insights that marked the day. Read our full Day 2 coverage here. These are five highlights:

Courtesy of Unidad Latino En Acción / Facebook

Immigrant rights activists in Connecticut want communities to know that a federal Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agent dressed as a local police officer in Hartford earlier this month. That was confirmed by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin this week.

On Tuesday morning, the Department of Homeland Security announced new restrictions for personal electronics on direct flights to the U.S. from 10 airports in the Middle East and North Africa. Devices larger than a cellphone will not be allowed in the cabin, though they will be allowed in checked baggage.

Later Tuesday, the U.K. announced it would be enforcing a similar rule — using a slightly different list of countries.

The rule change in both countries was unexpected and the explanations for it cryptic.

Here's a quick look at what we know, and what we don't.

Jim Cole / AP

Roads and railroads flooded, and beaches destroyed. This could be the reality for communities near Long Island Sound, and the East and Hudson Rivers if projections in a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation report bear out.

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