Steve Bannon, Out As Chief White House Strategist, Heads Back To Breitbart

Updated at 7:40 pm ET Steve Bannon has lost his job as chief White House strategist. The White House described the departure as a mutual agreement between Bannon and chief of staff John Kelly. "We are grateful for his service and wish him the best," said press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Bannon has been a larger-than-life character in Trumpworld: a right-wing provocateur whose rumpled wardrobe and radical politics belied his background at Goldman Sachs and Harvard Business School. ...

Read More

What We Know: Multiple Terrorist Attacks Hit Spain

Spanish police say they've arrested four people in connection to terrorist attacks that killed 14 people and injured more than 100 others in and around Barcelona Thursday. Five suspects were killed as they tried to carry out a second terrorist attack in a nearby city. The current location of the driver of a white van that plowed through a crowd of people on Barcelona's landmark Las Ramblas boulevard Thursday afternoon remains unknown. Two brothers have been named in reports about the search...

Read More

Once Shot For Advocating For Girls' Education, Malala Is Going To Oxford

Malala Yousafzai was only 15 when she was shot by the Taliban in Pakistan for campaigning for the education of girls. Now, she has been accepted to Oxford, one of the world's elite universities. Malala tweeted, "So excited to go to Oxford!!!" She also congratulated other students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland who received news Thursday about their university futures. At Oxford Malala will study philosophy, politics and economics. Gaining a place at an elite university is just the...

Read More

A lot of people are counting on special counsel Robert Mueller.

President Trump's calculation about Afghanistan boils down to a familiar question in U.S. national security: Of all the bad options, what's the least worst?

Trump, Vice President Pence and other national security team members are scheduled to convene at Camp David on Friday to review the next phase of the nearly 16-year war.

Defense Secretary James Mattis told reporters at the Pentagon this week that all options remain in play as the White House weighs a long-awaited new strategy.

If one glass of wine takes the edge off, why not drink a few more?

This thinking may help explain the findings of a new study that points to an increase in drinking among adults in the U.S., especially women.

A majority of Americans think President Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was "not strong enough," according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Fifty-two percent of respondents said so, as compared with just over a quarter (27 percent) who thought it was strong enough.

One by one, three teenage brothers left Guatemala on foot and made their way to the U.S., trying to escape La Mara Salvatrucha — the gang known as MS-13.

Now they're together again, reunited in a rural part of Long Island with their mother, who came here years ago.

And they're being terrorized by the same gang they fled.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump declared Wednesday he is disbanding two economic advisory panels, after a growing number of the corporate CEO's who sat on them decided to leave, in the wake of Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Trump said in a tweet that he is ending the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative and the Strategic and Policy Forum "rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople" that made up those groups.

Mike Groll / AP

There’s growing pressure on a group of breakaway Democrats in the State Senate to reunite with the mainstream Democrats and form a majority to rule the Senate.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

A group of House members say they have the key to break the gridlock over the Affordable Care Act. They call themselves the “Problem Solvers” caucus.

The aftermath of the violent protest and counterprotests in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend continue to reverberate across the country — sparking discussions about race and the country's Civil War past.

Mourners gathered in Charlottesville on Wednesday to remember Heather Heyer, who was killed on Saturday when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting the white nationalist rally. Attendees were asked to wear purple, Heyer's favorite color, in her memory.

Pat Eaton-Robb / AP

Connecticut public school educators are urging Governor Malloy and state lawmakers to agree on a state budget before schools reopen in two weeks. They say the lack of state budget would adversely affect public education in the state.

Pages

Win tickets!

Starting September 2

WNYC & WSHU want your help

To locate Confederate flags in our area

Vintage Radio

Essays about the radios and technology of yesteryear

Kate Remington's conversations with video game composers and performers

On an extraordinary music tour

Fresh, essential...for a Sunday state of mind

Breaking New Ground: WSHU's Capital Campaign

Music Interviews

Conversations with the people instrumental in creating today's live and recorded classical music

Local, regional and national political insights

Looking for something to do?

Learn about the music and lives of the great composers

Essays by WSHU's Monday morning commentator David Bouchier

Learn about stories, music highlights, special events & station updates

More stories from NPR