Shots - Health News
9:40 am
Tue June 11, 2013

A Delay In Relief From Copays For Costly Drugs

Expensive prescriptions drugs can stretch people's finances, even if they have insurance.
iStockphoto.com

For people with a chronic or serious illness, drugs that can help slow or cure the disease often put a financial strain on even the best insurance coverage.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Tue June 11, 2013

See-Through Pants Problem Behind Her, Lululemon CEO To Leave

Christine Day. She's planning to step down as CEO of Lululemon.
Brendan McDermid Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:51 am

Saying that "now is the right time to bring in a CEO who will drive the next phase of Lululemon's development and growth," the yoga and athletic clothing company's chief has announced she's stepping down.

Christine Day will stay on in her job until a successor is found, Lululemon says.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Pew: Majority Of Americans Support NSA Phone Tracking

A table showing how the public feels about the balance of privacy and security.
Pew

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:05 am

We're a little late noting this poll, but it's important so we're backing up a bit: A Pew poll released Monday finds a majority of Americans — 56 percent — think the National Security Agency's tracking of phone records "is an acceptable way for the government to investigate terrorism."

Forty-one percent say it is unacceptable.

Pew adds:

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

As NSA Leaker Disappears, Talk Of More To Come And Charges

Edward Snowden's revelations about National Security Agency have been front page news around the world, including in Hong Kong — where he was last seen.
Bobby Yip Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:05 am

The latest news about 29-year-old Edward Snowden and the secrets he has revealed about the nation's surveillance programs includes:

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Book News: Sales Of Orwell's '1984' Spike After NSA Revelations

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:17 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Tue June 11, 2013

In Istanbul, Police Move Against Anti-Government Protesters

People run away from tear gas which is thrown by riot police during a clash at Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey.
Tolga Bozoglu EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:10 pm

Update at 8:42 p.m. ET. Unrest May Continue All Night:

As Tuesday night wore into Wednesday morning, Turkish riot police were clashing with demonstrators in Istanbul's Taksim Square. Barrages of tear gas were fired into the square, where several fires burned on vehicles and other material. Some protesters were equipped with gas masks.

Speaking on television Tuesday, Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan said he will not bend to the protesters' demands. Here's a portion of that speech, from the BBC:

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Parallels
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Inmates In A Venezuelan Prison Build A World Of Their Own

At this prison in Barinas, Venezuela, the inmates are in charge.
Steve Inskeep NPR

In Latin America — home to the vast majority of the world's most violent cities — it's said the only part of a prison a guard controls is the gate, leaving convicts to fend for themselves inside, even running criminal networks from behind bars.

I wanted to understand how a prison like that worked, and I was in luck: A colleague knew a man serving time a Venezuelan prison. The prisoner got in touch with the leader of the inmates, who sent word that he'd be willing to see us.

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Michele Norris is one of the most respected voices in American journalism. As NPR host and special correspondent, Norris produces in-depth profiles, interviews and series, and guest hosts NPR News programs.

Norris also leads the "The Race Card Project," an initiative to foster a wider conversation about race in America that she created after the publication of her 2010 family memoir, The Grace of Silence. In the book she turns her formidable interviewing and investigative skills on her own background to unearth long hidden family secrets that raise questions about her racial legacy and shed new light on America's complicated racial history.

The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:13 am

As we head into the summer months, NPR is looking back to the summer of 1963, a momentous year in civil rights history. As part of NPR's partnership with The Race Card Project, which asks people to distill their thoughts on race to six words, Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris is asking people who were on the front lines of history to share their memories and their thoughts on race in America today.

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Politics
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

How The Senate Farm Bill Would Change Subsidies

Third-generation Oklahoma farmer Scott Neufeld says crop insurance is important to his family's business.
Tamara Keith NPR

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:40 pm

The Senate voted Monday to approve its version of the farm bill, a massive spending measure that covers everything from food stamps to crop insurance and sets the nation's farm policy for the next five years.

The centerpiece of that policy is an expanded crop insurance program, designed to protect farmers from losses, that some say amounts to a highly subsidized gift to agribusiness. That debate is set to continue as the House plans to take up its version of the bill this month.

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