Cassandra Basler

Producer/Reporter

Cassandra Basler comes to WSHU by way of Columbia Journalism School in New York City. She recently graduated with a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship, which means she has two years to report on an issue anywhere in the world (she's still figuring out where she'd like to go). She grew up just north of Detroit, Michigan, where she worked for the local public radio affiliate. She also wrote about her adventures sampling the city cuisines for the first guidebook to be published in three decades, Belle Isle to 8 Mile: An Insider's Guide to Detroit. Before that, Cassandra studied English, German and Urban Studies at University of Michigan. When she's not reporting on wealth and poverty, she's writing about food and family.

Courtesy of Integrated Refugee & Immigration Services

As some kids are dreading going back to school, other students – and their mothers – are just wrapping up summer English classes with Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services. IRIS says the number of refugees enrolled in the summer language program has doubled since last year, so the non-profit launched a Mommy and Me class to fill the need.

First and Summerfield United Methodist Church / Facebook

A Connecticut father who was supposed to be deported to Ecuador on Tuesday has found sanctuary at First and Summerfield United Methodist Church in New Haven. Marco Reyes is the second Connecticut parent to live in a church while he builds an asylum case.

Courtesy of St. Jerome Church / Facebook

More than 200 people of different faiths gathered at St. Jerome Catholic Church in Norwalk on Monday night to support Jung Courville and her family. She’s a mother of two U.S.-born boys and is facing deportation to South Korea.  

Cassandra Basler / WSHU

In Connecticut, a father of two U.S.-born children faces deportation to Guatemala in 10 days.

Cassandra Basler / WSHU

A week ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Nury Chavarria had to board a flight to her native Guatemala. The mother of 4 U.S.-born children sought sanctuary at a New Haven church instead. Now Chavarria can leave the church basement and return home to her kids, while federal immigration court considers reopening her case.

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