Cassandra Basler

Producer/Reporter

Cassandra Basler comes to WSHU by way of Columbia Journalism School in New York City. She recently graduated with a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship, which means she has two years to report on an issue anywhere in the world (she's still figuring out where she'd like to go). She grew up just north of Detroit, Michigan, where she worked for the local public radio affiliate. She also wrote about her adventures sampling the city cuisines for the first guidebook to be published in three decades, Belle Isle to 8 Mile: An Insider's Guide to Detroit. Before that, Cassandra studied English, German and Urban Studies at University of Michigan. When she's not reporting on wealth and poverty, she's writing about food and family.

Caleb Jones / AP

The U.S. Supreme Court has asked plaintiffs against President Donald Trump’s so-called Muslim ban to file new briefs by next Thursday in response to his new executive order.

Courtesy of Pixabay

Girls who have been involved with Connecticut’s juvenile justice system are twice more likely than boys to have symptoms of PTSD. That’s according to research by Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance presented at a forum in Hartford on Wednesday. Those same girls also say they do not feel heard or included in decisions about their lives.

Jeff Chiu / AP

One of the nation’s top immigration lawyers says she’s skeptical that Congress will act on DACA before it ends in March. The Obama-era program granted two-year work permits to people that illegally came to the U.S. as kids. The Trump administration announced on Monday that it would end the program.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is criticizing President Trump’s decision to wind down DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the program that grants two-year work permits to undocumented people who came to the U.S. as minors. Trump has indicated he’d like the program to taper off over the next six months.

Courtesy of Integrated Refugee & Immigration Services

As some kids are dreading going back to school, other students – and their mothers – are just wrapping up summer English classes with Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services. IRIS says the number of refugees enrolled in the summer language program has doubled since last year, so the non-profit launched a Mommy and Me class to fill the need.

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