Charles Lane

Senior reporter for Long Island

Charles is a radio reporter, story teller, Excel ninja, database grasshopper and loves to FOIL records. He's worked for NPR, Deutche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Soundprint, Penthouse, the Religion News Service and the Catholic World Report. He's won three SPJ Public Service Awards, a National Murrow and was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists. He once did 8Gs in a stunt plane, caught a 10-foot wave (briefly) and dove 40 meters on a single breath. Charles is extraordinarily friendly so don't hesitate to contact.

Alex Brandon / AP

Attorneys general in New York and five other states are asking U.S. senators to reject President-elect Donald Trump's nomination for U.S. Attorney General. They’re concerned about Jeff Sessions' misconduct on previous legal cases. They also fear he will not extend hate crime protections to the LGBTQ community and will enforce draconian punishments for low level crimes.

Gunnar Rathbun / AP

Big box retailers and advocates for the poor are teaming up for their “biggest fight ever.” It’s against congressional Republicans who want to change the corporate tax code, in particular, taxes on imports and exports.

Frank Franklin II / AP

At least 100 people suffered minor injuries when a Long Island Rail Road train crashed into the “bumper block” at the Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn on Wednesday. The train from Far Rockaway hit and then went over the bumper at the end of Track 6 at about 8:20 a.m.

Kevin P. Coughlin/Office of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo / Flickr

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo wants free college tuition for students in families making less than $125,000 a year. At an estimated cost of $163 million a year, the program would triple state funding for higher education. But the plan may not reach as many students as the governor claims.

Julio Cortez / AP

Attorneys general in eight states and the District of Columbia have settled an inquiry into the on-call scheduling policies of several major retailers, resulting in more predictable work schedules for some 50,000 workers.

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