Charles Lane

Senior reporter for Long Island

Charles is a radio reporter, story teller, Excel ninja, database grasshopper and loves to FOIL records. He's worked for NPR, Deutche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Soundprint, Penthouse, the Religion News Service and the Catholic World Report. He's won three SPJ Public Service Awards, a National Murrow and was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists. He once did 8Gs in a stunt plane, caught a 10-foot wave (briefly) and dove 40 meters on a single breath. Charles is extraordinarily friendly so don't hesitate to contact.

Charles Lane / WSHU

In a gutted house in Bellaire, Texas, Sean Westerling and his helper measure everything –  closets, doorways, windows.

“You need to get the serial number off this freezer,” Westerling says.

FEMA wants serial numbers to make sure taxpayers didn't already pay for appliances in the last storm.

Property owners started filing insurance claims before the rain even stopped. They wanted to get to the front of what's expected to be a long line of flood claims, according to Joel Moore, an independent insurance adjuster for Gulf Coast Claims in Houston.

"They filed claims before they evacuated," he says. "So they actually have no idea if there's damage or not. They just wanted to be at the front end of the curve."

Evan Vucci / AP

A fourth business executive has abandoned President Trump’s business advisory council following criticism that the president moved too slowly in condemning race-fueled violence in Charlottesville.

Alan Goffinski / AP

A neo-Nazi website that mocked a victim killed in the Charlottesville protests over the weekend has been banned by GoDaddy and Google, but the website is still up.

Securities and Exchange Commission / United States Government

The Securites and Exchange Commission fined Halliburton $30 million for bribing a foreign official for an oil servicing contract. It’s the first bribery case the SEC has pursued since the start of the Trump administration.

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