Charles Lane

Senior reporter for Long Island

Charles is a radio reporter, story teller, Excel ninja, database grasshopper and loves to FOIL records. He's worked for NPR, Deutche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Soundprint, Penthouse, the Religion News Service and the Catholic World Report. He's won three SPJ Public Service Awards, a National Murrow and was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists. He once did 8Gs in a stunt plane, caught a 10-foot wave (briefly) and dove 40 meters on a single breath. Charles is extraordinarily friendly so don't hesitate to contact.

Charles Lane / WSHU

Updated 5:27 pm

Mangano, his wife, and Venditto all pleaded "not guilty" at their arraignment and were released after posting bond. Mangano says he is innocent and will not resign despite calls to do so from Nassau County Republican candidates who are on the ballot this Election Day.

"I have an opportunity, when at the proper time, to present my evidence that rebukes any of this nonsense that I would ever do anything that sacrifices my oath of office," Mangano says.

Mangano, his wife, and Venditto are due back in court on December 7.

Charles Lane / WSHU

At first impression Maria Vullo is guarded, and a bit camera shy. But when she talks about her legal work, going back decades, you can feel her conviction.

“When I went after a domestic terrorist in the Planned Parenthood case, no one would say I wasn’t tough.”

Mike Groll / AP

New York’s Department of Financial Services blasted New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli’s office, saying it’s wasted almost $4 billion in fees to hedge funds.

Gerald Herbert / AP

After six days on the witness stand, Hank Greenberg, the former head of AIG, has finished testifying in his defense against charges that he defrauded investors of half a billion dollars. He left court on Thursday with a scowl.

Louis Lanzano / AP

New York's Attorney General's office finally got its chance to put former AIG head Hank Greenberg on the witness stand on Tuesday. For 11 years his defense team fought accusations of fraud with multiple rounds of motions, appeals and depositions. Now that Greenberg is 91, prosecutors have to be careful not to be seen as bullying an old man.