David Bouchier

Sunday Matinee host, commentator

David began as a print journalist in London and taught at a British university for almost twenty years. After coming to the United States in 1986 he continued to teach and to publish a regular humor column in The New York Times regional edition.  He joined WSHU as a weekly commentator in 1992, becoming host of Sunday Matinee in 1996. His latest book of essays, Peripheral Vision, was published in 2011. His other books include A Few Well Chosen Words, The Song of Suburbia, The Cats and the Water Bottles, The Accidental Immigrant and Writer at Work. He lives in Stony Brook, New York with his wife who is a professor at Stony Brook University, and two un-musical cats.

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David Bouchier 9/15/14
11:05 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Out of Thin Air

Back in the nineteen-twenties this nation went mad about radio. In 1922 there were about 100,000 domestic radios in use, and thirty broadcasting stations. By 1924 there were half a million radio sets and over five hundred stations. Radio just kept on growing from there.

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David Bouchier 9/8/14
8:32 am
Mon September 8, 2014

Conspicuous Consultation

Unemployment is the biggest economic problem we have right now, and consultancy is the obvious solution. Anyone can set up as a consultant on just about anything, apart from the great monopolies of medicine and law.  You can buy the skills of an ex-architect or an ex-computer programmer, an ex-banker, or even an ex-executive for a tiny fraction of what they would have cost when they had real jobs.

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David Bouchier 9/1/14
9:36 am
Mon September 1, 2014

Hard Labor

For most American families Labor Day is not about the history of the American Trade Union movement, but that’s what it was about for a hundred years. Labor Day is supposed to celebrate the dignity of labor, but how that tradition has faded.  For several years the traditional Labor Day march in New York was canceled due to security concerns or lack of interest. It has been revived as a shadow of its former self, but more like an all-purpose carnival. Only about one in ten Americans now belongs to a union.

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David Bouchier 8/25/14
8:03 am
Mon August 25, 2014

Tourism by the Numbers

August brought the tourists flocking back to the south of France like swallows returning to San Capistrano. The roads were full of little Dutch caravans going at forty miles an hour, and big Mercedes with Belgian plates going at a hundred and te

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David Bouchier 8/11/14
8:30 am
Mon August 11, 2014

On the Beach

There's something magnetic about the sea. A third of all Americans choose to live on or near the coast, even though there are vast empty spaces with plenty of parking out in the middle of the country. We are especially lucky on Long Island. Because the island is just a narrow finger of sand, getting narrower with every storm, we are never far from a beach, just as we are never far from a pizza.

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