Davis Dunavin

Reporter

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He fell in love with sound-rich radio storytelling while working as an assistant reporter at KBIA public radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before coming back to radio, he worked in digital journalism as the editor of Newtown Patch. As a freelance reporter, his work for WSHU aired nationally on NPR. Davis is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism; he started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.

Davis Dunavin / WSHU

There’s a tiny island off the coast of Connecticut. Its residents are more than ten thousand little white seabirds called terns. They have long orange beaks and sometimes ominous black tufts on their heads. There might be more terns on this island than anywhere on earth. And for fifty years, one woman has served as steward and caretaker.

Courtesy of Pixabay

The town of Greenwich, Connecticut, was one of several around the country to see local Democrats win seats in this week’s election. But it drew national news, before the election, when the campaign turned ugly online. 

AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs has missed a deadline to approve or reject plans for a tribal casino in East Windsor, Connecticut. The casino would be jointly owned by the state’s two federally recognized Native American tribes. The tribes say this is not going to stop them from going ahead with their plans.

Collection of Jack and Beverly Wilgus / Wikimedia Commons

A grisly construction accident in New England in 1848 left railroad worker Phineas Gage with severe brain damage – but gave scientists valuable clues about how the brain functions. Gage survived the metal spike that went clear through his head and has since become an icon of both science and pop culture. His skull is on display at Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.


Mel Evans / AP

The FBI has released more than 1,500 pages of documents relating to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that killed 20 children and six educators. The documents largely cover the life of shooter Adam Lanza.

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