Davis Dunavin

Reporter

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He fell in love with sound-rich radio storytelling while working as an assistant reporter at KBIA public radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before coming back to radio, he worked in digital journalism as the editor of Newtown Patch. As a freelance reporter, his work for WSHU aired nationally on NPR. Davis is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism; he started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.

Davis Dunavin / WSHU

You probably know about the phenomenon of Stonehenge – an ancient alignment of giant slabs that acts as a cosmic calendar. There’s something like that here in the U.S. too. It’s called MIThenge. And yes, it’s at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – MIT – in Cambridge.

Bob Child / AP

Businessman Ned Lamont says he’s filing paperwork today in a bid for the Democratic nomination for governor of Connecticut.

Ed Betz / AP

A federal judge in New York says environmentalists can move ahead with a lawsuit against the federal government to stop the sale of Plum Island. Seven environmental groups, including Save the Sound, are suing the Department of Homeland Security and the General Services Administration. 

Brian Gratwicke / Flickr

Scientists at Yale took a look at the diet of tadpoles in suburban ponds, and they made a discovery that – fair warning – is a bit gross. It turns out human waste plays a much larger role in the suburban ecosystem than we thought.

Anthony Moaton

 

Stamford City Council member Raven Matherne is the first openly transgender lawmaker in Connecticut’s history. She was elected in November. Matherne was one of several council members to back a move to eliminate gender-based pronouns from the council’s rules of order. WSHU’s Davis Dunavin recently spoke with her about why it’s an important move. Below is a transcript of their conversation.

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