Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

www.ccPixs.com
ccPixs.com / Flickr

This month marked 25 years since Connecticut lawmakers passed a universal state income tax. According to the Yankee Institute, a conservative think tank in Hartford, the state has taken in about $126 billion through income taxes since 1991. The Institute says in that time state government spending has grown dramatically and much of that revenue has been used for debt servicing and public employee benefits.

Charles Krupa / AP

On Tuesday Governor Dannel Malloy announced that 3,800 new jobs have been created in Connecticut by a business incentive program he introduced five years ago.

Hannah Rosen / Flickr

On Monday Connecticut’s Congressional Delegation sent a letter to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus seeking to keep the servicing of the President’s Marine One helicopter fleet in Connecticut.   

Evan Vucci / AP

This has been quite an eventful week for the Donald Trump presidential campaign. A few days ago the campaign’s top management was beefed up with additional personnel. Last weekend the GOP presidential candidate made a campaign stop in Fairfield, Connecticut. The stop baffled conventional wisdom because Connecticut is not considered a battleground state.

Jessica Hill / AP

Connecticut Senate President Martin Looney of New Haven needs a new kidney. This was made public on a Facebook post by Father James Manship, pastor of St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in New Haven, where Looney was a parishioner in his youth.  

Senator Looney says he’s just been approved for a kidney transplant at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and he feels fine right now.

He says he’s thankful that Father Manship posted the appeal on Facebook because the average wait for a kidney transplant for those who don’t have a family match is four to five years.  

Pages