Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s Commissioner for the Department of Children and Families, Joette Katz, is seeking an independent review of the safety of children at a state-run psychiatric hospital in Middletown.

The commissioner made the announcement on Thursday in response to the suicide of a pregnant 16-year-old girl there last month.

Katz says the independent review will be conducted by experts in maintaining a safe environment in psychiatric treatment facilities, like the state’s children’s hospital in Middletown. It will also assess staff training, emergency protocols and equipment.

Connecticut Republican Party

Two Republican candidates running for governor of Connecticut used a GOP gubernatorial debate at Fairfield University Wednesday night to argue over which one of them is a real Republican.

Four of the five candidates contesting Connecticut’s August 14 Republican Party primary took part in the debate. The candidates did not differ much on policy including cutting taxes, renegotiating state employee contracts and seeking public-private partnerships to stimulate the economy.

Courtesy of Jahana Hayes for U.S. Congress / Facebook

A liberal social media company has helped propel a first-time candidate for Congress in Connecticut to national attention. A video introducing Waterbury educator and 2016 national Teacher of the Year, Jahana Hayes, has gone viral with more than 5.5 million views since its release last Thursday.

Jessica Hill / AP

The Connecticut Democratic Party-endorsed candidate for governor, Ned Lamont, is once again having to deal with an issue that first came up in 2006 during his unsuccessful campaign to unseat former U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman. The issue was raised at a Democratic gubernatorial forum at the Varick Memorial AME Zion Church in New Haven Sunday.

Jessica Hill / AP

In a debate in New Haven Thursday night, the two candidates contesting the Connecticut Democratic Party primary for governor sparred over who would best represent the Connecticut voter. The debate was sponsored by the Connecticut Association of Realtors.

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