Ebong Udoma

Senior reporter

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

Ways to Connect

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The next U.S. Congress convenes tomorrow with Republicans in control of both the House and Senate. The repeal of the Affordable Care Act is top on their agenda, but Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn., says the Republicans might not find that easy to do.

Julie Jacobson / AP

Some Connecticut residents who are benefiting from the Affordable Care Act are speaking up in an effort to convince the Republican-controlled Congress to reconsider repealing President Barack Obama’s signature legislation.

Jessica Hill / AP

Connecticut Senate President Martin Looney says he's feeling strong after kidney transplant surgery at Yale-New Haven Hospital earlier this week. The 68-year-old New Haven Democrat says he’s looking forward to being back at the state Capitol for the first day of the new session on January 4.

Courtesy of the State of Connecticut

The Democratic and Republican leaders of the Connecticut Senate say they’ve reached an agreement to share control of their chamber. This comes after both sides ended up with an equal number of seats as a result of the November election.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Connecticut environmental groups say they oppose President-elect Donald Trump’s choice of Oklahoma Republican Attorney General Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency.  

Pages